DANISH PARLIMENTARIANS

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Transcript DANISH PARLIMENTARIANS

Citizenship and
Immigration Canada
Citoyenneté et
Immigration Canada
Immigrant and Refugee Integration
The Canadian Way
Concepts and Context
San Jose, Costa Rica
June 23, 2005
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OVERVIEW
Katharine Cornfield
Director, Integration Promotion
Integration Branch, CIC
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MANAGED MIGRATION TO CANADA

Government establishes annual plan for immigration
and reports to Parliament

Goal is to select and admit approximately 225,000
permanent residents each year

Balance of economic immigrants, family members
and refugees is intended to facilitate successful
integration

Canada also admits thousands of temporary
residents each year
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TYPES OF MIGRATION
•Temporary Residents
•Students
•Temporary Workers
•Permanent Residents
•Economic
•Non-Economic (Family Class)
•Refugees
•Resettled
•Asylum
•Without Status
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THE IMMIGRATION ACT

The Immigration and Refugee Protection Act affirms
fundamental principles of non-discrimination and
universality

The Act articulates three basic goals for selecting
immigrants for permanent residence based on our
economic, social, and humanitarian values

The Act also defines visitor status for students and
temporary workers.
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IMMIGRATION AND THE CONSTITUTION

Constitutionally, immigration is a shared jurisdictional responsibility:
• federal government responsible for entry, asylum, processing and removal
activities
• some provincial involvement in immigrant and overseas refugee selection
and in settlement and integration services

Constitutionally, health, education and social services are provincial
responsibilities with federal transfer payments.

Permanent residents, including refugees, have full access to social
services, health services and education.

Federal government provides some specialized services to permanent
residents and refugees.
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A SNAPSHOT OF DIVERSITY IN CANADA

40 years ago, the top 10 immigrant source
countries were European

In 2003, the top five source countries for
immigrants were Asian

The characteristics of Canada’s population
are changing
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CLUSTERED IN THREE CITIES

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Canada’s immigrant and refugee population
largely urban:

73% of the immigrants settle in Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal

Resettled refugees also destined to
medium-sized and large communities
Key tool to social cohesion – effective
immigrant integration
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SOCIAL COHESION - THE CANADIAN CONTEXT

Canada’s history is built upon three key elements of diversity

Census 2001 – 5.4 million individuals born outside of the
country – 18% of our population

Four million individuals identified as visible minorities– 13% of
our total population of 29.6 million

Diversity presents the country with opportunities
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CANADA’S SHARED CITIZENSHIP MODEL
 Canadians have developed a unique model of
“shared citizenship”
 Key success factors: shared core values, shared
rights and responsibilities
 Common goal of building an inclusive society
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ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES

Multiculturalism fosters cultural participation, active
citizenship and participation in Canada’s civic life,
and strengthens connections among Canadians

In 10 years – 100% of our net labour force growth
will come from immigrants

In 20 years – 100% of our net population growth will
come from immigration
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CANADA’S LEGAL FRAMEWORK


Canada’s comprehensive legal framework provides
essential constructs to support social cohesion:
The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
supported by:







the Canadian Bill of Rights (1960)
the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (1962/2002)
the Official Languages Act (1969/85)
the Canadian Human Rights Act (1977/85)
the Citizenship Act (1985)
the Employment Equity Act (1986/95)
the Multiculturalism Act (1988)
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PUBLIC PERCEPTIONS OF MIGRATION

Public support is essential to sustain Canada’s
immigration and integration programs.

Canada measures public attitudes at regular intervals
through opinion polling and research.

To maintain public support, Canada actively promotes
basic understanding of the economic and social
benefits of immigration, supports successful
integration of newcomers and combats racism and
discrimination through public education and outreach.
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CANADA’S INTEGRATION MODEL
Katharine Cornfield,
Director, Integration Promotion
Integration Branch, CIC
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WHAT IS INTEGRATION?
The Federal Immigrant Integration Strategy (1992)
defines integration as:
The ability to contribute, free of barriers, to every dimension of
Canadian life – economic, social, cultural and political.
The Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (2002)
states as an objective:
3. (1) e to promote the successful integration of permanent
residents into Canada, while recognizing that integration
involves mutual obligations for new immigrants and Canadian
society
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INTEGRATION: THE CANADIAN MODEL

Facilitate newcomers to settle, adapt and
integrate into Canadian society

Two-way process –requires active participation
of both newcomers and society

Ultimate objective- acquisition of citizenship
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POLICY UNDERPINNINGS

2-way process – rights and responsibilities

Acknowledgment of shared values
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Language proficiency

Financial self-sufficiency

Socio-economic participation
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PARTNERSHIP
WHO NEEDS TO BE INVOLVED
PROVINCIAL GOV'TS
FEDERAL GOV'T
MUNICIPAL GOV'TS
THE REFUGEE
BUSINESS
COMMUNITY
VOLUNTARY
SECTOR
PRIVATE SPONSORSHIP
COMMUNITY
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CANADIAN INTEGRATION MODEL
Services Abroad
1- Canadian Orientation Abroad
A
2- Reception in Canada
“Welcome to Canada” at Ports of Entry
Refugee Reception at Ports of Entry
Services In Canada
B
Integration Programs
Partnership Delivery
Community Capacity
Building
C
Certificate
of
Canadian Citizenship
Certificat
de
Citoyenneté Canadienne
3- Settlement
Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP)
Private Sponsorship
Immigrant Settlement and Adaptation Program (ISAP),
including ELT
Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC)
Host Program
Partnerships with other government departments, other
governments, international/national and local organizations
John Doe
Citizenship Services
D
Is a Canadian citizen under the
provisions of the Citizenship Act
and, as such, is entitled to all the
rights and privileges and is subject
to all the duties and responsibilities
of a Canadian citizen
est citoyen canadien aux termes
de la Loi sur la citoyenneté et, à ce
titre, jouit de tous les droits et
privilèges et est assujetti(e) à tous
les devoirs et responsabilités d'un
citoyen canadien.
MINISTER - MINISTRE
4- Citizenship
Citizenship Preparation
Grant of Canadian Citizenship
Full Participation in Canadian Society
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