Types of Sentences

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Transcript Types of Sentences

Types of Sentences
Complete Thoughts That
Make Your Writing
Interesting
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Basic Parts of Sentences
1. Subject (noun) - the person or
thing acting in the sentence
2. Predicate (verb) - the action that
takes place in the sentence
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Four Types of Sentences
1. Declarative
2. Interrogative
3. Exclamatory
4. Imperative
Using the different sentence types will give
your writing variety and interest.
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Declarative Sentence
This sentence makes a statement,
and ends with a period.
"The little boy plays with his new toy."
OR
"My favorite day of the week is Saturday,
because I can go out and play with my
friends."
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Interrogative Sentence
This sentence asks a question,
and ends with a question mark.
"Did you see that?"
OR
"When do you want me to pick you up tomorrow?"
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Exclamatory Sentence
This sentence shows strong emotion or feeling,
and ends with an exclamation mark.
"I can't believe you jumped that high!"
OR
"This is the best birthday I've ever
had!"
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Imperative Sentence
This sentence gives a direction or command, and
ends with a period or exclamation mark.
"Please shut the door."
But where is the subject in this sentence?
In imperative sentences, the subject is often implied:
"[You] shut the door."
Sometimes, the subject is named (but the "you" is still
implied):
"Johnny, shut the door now!"
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The end.
More free SENTENCE WRITING resources:
fragments & run-ons
simple, complex & compound sentences
common sentence errors
improving sentence structure
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Eight-week SENTENCE WRITING courses:
elementary school
middle school
high school
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