Social Enterprise Third Sector Partnership in Action – rhetoric and reality Format for the session Update on DH social enterprise development programme Social enterprise in.

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Transcript Social Enterprise Third Sector Partnership in Action – rhetoric and reality Format for the session Update on DH social enterprise development programme Social enterprise in.

Social Enterprise
Third Sector Partnership in Action –
rhetoric and reality
Format for the session
Update on DH social enterprise
development programme
Social enterprise in action – Connected
Care, Hartlepool
Discussion about opportunities and
challenges
?Questions?
2
What is a social enterprise?
• Social Enterprise (SE) covers a variety of types of
organisation
• Primarily social objectives
• Surpluses reinvested in the business or community
• Innovative, flexible business and service models
• Mutual governance models, service users and staff in
control
• Best of both worlds – business rigour, public service
ethos.
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What are the benefits of an SE?
January 2006 White paper
• Enhanced quality health
and social care provision
• Better fit with needs of
particular client/ patient
groups
• Expert knowledge in
specific areas
• Innovation and
entrepreneurship
• Value for money
• Wider social dividend
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The role of the DH SE Unit
• “…to promote a vibrant social enterprise sector
in health and social care.”
How?
• by supporting the development of SE business
models
• by opening up marketing and commissioning to
social enterprises
• by encouraging new entrants to social enterprise
• by championing the value of social enterprise
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SE Unit Objectives
• Provide support and information
– resource pack and website
• Set up an SE investment fund
– £73m investment fund from April 2007
– £1m for Pathfinders in 2006/07
– help with start up costs
– seed corn equity
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SE Unit Objectives
• Identify and work with pathfinder projects
– Almost 400 applications received
– Robust selection process
– 26 pathfinders selected
– Support in cash / kind
– Evaluation / sharing learning
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SE Pathfinder Analysis
• 2/3 per region – innovative service and business
models
• 64% partnerships involving statutory and third
sectors wanting to provide holistic, user-centred
services
• 20% health / social care professionals wanting to
set up ‘spin out’ SEs
• 16% existing social enterprises wanting to enter
health / social care market
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SE Pathfinders - Examples
• Devon Healthy Living Community – integrated
teams including VCS providing early intervention
services.
• Dementia Care Partnership, Newcastle –
providing holistic services to people with
dementia and their carers.
• Secure Healthcare – providing prison and
offender healthcare services in partnerships
involving VCS.
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SE Unit Objectives
• Establish local support networks for SEs
– Partnership working
• Health Authorities
• Regional Development Agencies
• Care Services Improvement Partnership
• Social Enterprise Coalition
• Act as a hub for SE policy issues
– align levers and incentives
– tackle barriers and challenges
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Contact details
Sue White
Social Enterprise Unit
Quarry House
Quarry Hill
t: (0113) 2545028
Leeds
LS2 7UE
e: [email protected]
Other sources of information:
www.sbs.gov.uk/socialenterprise
www.socialenterprise.org.uk
www.networks.nhs.uk
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Delivering Connected
Care
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‘Connected Care’
Turning Point/IPPR
• A service designed and delivered for the
local community by the local community
• Based on local audit of needs and
aspirations
• Local specification of Connected Care
drawn up by service users and providers
• Reformed locality commissioning,
budgetting and monitoring processes
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Visionary & Integrating with
government’s agendas
• Develops new ways to involve local
community in the design and delivery of
services
• It provides integrated services that meets
the whole needs of the community
• It provides a way to support choice and
personalisation
• Easy to access services for everyone in 14
Hartlepool: the Owton context
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1950s and 1960s Council Estate
Lowest 1% for employment and health
13% unemployment (6.5% Hartlepool)
49% households limiting long term illness
Lowest 2% for income
Good housing stock and physical
environment (SRB)
• Open space and countryside
• Local shops and community facilities
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Connected Care Audit
• Funded by DH (50%), SEU, Turning Point,
PCT, LA, Housing Hartlepool
• UCLAN, Host Community Association and
Turning Point
• Conducted by audit team of residents
• University accredited training
• Interviews, focus groups, ‘have your say’
event and community profile
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Community Engagement
• “People don’t fall into neat categories and that’s the whole idea of
Connected Care of course”.
• We’re surveyed to death” nothing happens
• The audit is not simply a community based information gathering
tool, it is the first stage in engaging the community in the process of
developing a specification for Connected Care Services’ (University
of Durham evaluation)
• It enables communities to have a say in what services need to be
commissioned.
• It is a capacity building tool for individuals, community groups and
agencies.
• A community researcher role differs from traditional professional
research.
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Audit Results
Overarching Conclusion
‘The community have identified a range of
solutions to deliver responsive services for
(local people). It is hoped that Connected
Care will build community capacity with
services designed and delivered by the local
community.
Services should be flexible and easy to
access and meet the whole needs of Owton.
Services also need to be outcome driven and
delivered by a professional and coordinated 18
Owton Connected Care
Service
Delivered through a social enterprise
• Navigation Service-Local recruitment
• Complex Needs Service- seconded staff
from Housing, Trust,PCT,Adult Services
• Transformation co-ordinator
Reporting through Local Neighbourhood
Forum
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Why Social Enterprise
• Maximum opportunity for the community of
Owton and its representative organisations to
exercise control over the way services are
delivered
• To drive re-configuration of existing services
• To shape the priorities of the commissioners
• A local service delivery model to meet the needs
of the local community.
• Allow social entrepreneurs to develop new
services
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Owton Connected Care Social
Enterprise
• Partnership Board – PCT, SSD, TP, Local
Groups
• Pathfinder Bid –legal and business
support for set up
• Social Enterprise will employ, second or
sub contract for Connected Care service.
• Implementation Plan Agreed
• In Budgets from April
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Integration Challenges
• Achieving buy in at suitably strategic
(CEO) level
• Dilution – Talk a storm; deliver a breeze
• Resist chasing the funny money
• Identify outcomes/benefits realisation up
front
• Balancing conflicting agendas
• Getting past the usual suspects
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Achievements
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Evaluated the process
Maintained commitment
Political Support
Overcame the professional/people
paradox
• Will deliver an integrated service
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Delivering Connected
Care
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