Cornell Notes Periodic Table of the Elements

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Transcript Cornell Notes Periodic Table of the Elements

Cornell Notes Periodic Table of the
Elements.
A scientist, named Mendeleev, created the Periodic Table of the
Elements. He did not discover all of the elements. He just
recognized that the elements had similar characteristics, and
placed them in order. For example, he noticed that the element
Boron had 5 protons, and 5 electrons. So, he assigned it the
atomic number 5 and placed it in the 5th spot on the table.
Carbon has 6 protons, and 6 electrons, so he assigned it the
atomic number 6 and placed it behind Boron on the table. Each
element on the table is made up of only one type of atom. Ex:
Boron only has Boron atoms, Carbon only has Carbon atoms. It is
the same for every element on the table. All matter is made up
of atoms (elements). Matter is neither created nor destroyed, it
is merely changed. This is called the Law of Conservation of
Matter.
How to read key box of Periodic Table.
• The top number in each box (in your book)
tells you the atomic number (same as
protons, electrons).
• Then you will see the element symbol (first
letter of each symbol is capitalized, the rest
are not)
• Then you will see the name of the Element
• Then you will see the atomic mass number.
Groups/Columns on the Periodic Table
• Elements (atoms) in the same group/column have
the same number of electrons in their Outermost
enery level.
Groups/Columns on the Periodic Table
Group numbers are found at the top
of each column.
• Group/Column 1: Called Alkali Metals-highly
reactive. This means that they bond easily
because they only have 1 electron. They are
all metals and conduct heat and electricity
easily. They are the softest metals.
Group/Column
• Group 2 are the alkaline metals. Alkaline metals
are also good conductors of heat/electricity. They
also bond easily with other elements because
they only have 2 electrons.
• Groups 3-12 are called transition metals. They
conduct electricity and heat.
• Groups 13, 14, 15 are called other metals. They
are all solids.
• Groups 14-16 are the non-metals. They are very
brittle and don’t conduct electricity or heat well.
Group/Column
Halogens are five non-metal elements found in
group 17. They bond easily because their outer
shells are missing 1 electron.
Group 18 is the noble gases. They don’t bond
because their outer shells are full.
Periods/Rows on the Periodic Table
• The elements in each period/row are placed
according to their atomic number, or number
of protons and electrons. As you move across
the period/row, the atomic number, or
number of protons and electrons, increases by
one. All of the elements in one period/row
have similar chemical characteristics.
Image of Periods/rows on Periodic
Table.
• Period/row numbers are located to the left of
the row on the table.
Other facts about Periodic Table
• All atoms in the same group/column have
similar chemical properties.
• All atoms in the same period/row have similar
chemical properties.
• Some elements are solids, some are liquids,
some are gases.
• All elements are arranged on the PT according
to their similar chemical
properties/characteristics.
Match the element on the left that has
the most similar characteristics the
element on the right:
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Carbon(C)
Calcium(Ca)
Nickel(Ni)
Lanthanum(La)
Helium(He)
Chromium(Cr)
Flourine(F)
Actinum(Ac)
Tungsten(W)
Iodine(I)
Krypton(Kr)
Tin(Sn)
Barium(Ba)
Platinum(Pt)