When people decide to leave the city... Counterurbanisation

download report

Transcript When people decide to leave the city... Counterurbanisation

•To know what counterurbanisation is
•To understand the causes, consequences and solutions to
counterurbanisation
Using the images above produce a push and pull table for rural (countryside)
and urban (towns or city) areas
Extension: Will these be the same for an LEDC?
Push and pull factors for migration
from rural and urban areas in MEDCs
Rural
Push
Poorly paid
jobs
Boring
Pull
Peace and quiet
Low crime rates
Urban
Push
Pull
High crime rates Vibrant nightlife
Overcrowded
Would these tables be the same
for LEDC rural and urban area?
Explain your answer.
More jobs
In 2007 more than 105,000 people in the UK
moved from urban to rural areas: This is known
as:
COUNTERURBANISATION
Complete the activity to identify the
causes, effects and solutions to
Counterurbanisation in the UK
Explain why people in MEDCs move from urban to
rural areas (4)
1-2 marks: Identify 1 cause and 1 effect of counter-urbanisation:
e.g. House prices in the city are too expensive so people move to the
countryside, this can lead to a loss of rural characteristics because of
new developments
2-3 marks: explain one cause of counter-urbanisation
e.g. People are now moving to the countryside because house prices are a
lot cheaper and because of improved technology like computers and the
internet this means more people are working from home.
3-4 marks: well-developed explanation of 2 causes
e.g. People are now moving to the countryside because house prices are a
lot cheaper and because of improved technology like computers and the
internet this means more people are working from home, this has
resulted in a loss of community spirit in the countryside as more and
more people move in.
What is the stereotyped view of
counterurbanisation?
• People moving from the inner city or
suburbs to isolated rural cottages with
roses growing round the door.
In reality counterurbanisation is...
• People moving to commuter villages. These are
settlements that are a few miles away from a large
urban area. Many of the new inhabitants commute
back to the urban area to work.
• Railways and motorways can give affordable and quick
access to places that are 60 miles away from city
centres.
Key definition
Commuter range the distance
people will travel from their
homes to their place of work
How might a traditional village compare
to a commuter village?
• Commuter villages are a relatively recent concept (since
1980s) for people to travel easily to work in cities but live
in the countryside
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Housing
– Modern; large family homes; estates; conversions
Population structure
– Middle class, middle aged, families
Employment structure
– Professional; skilled; work in urban area
Transport
– Good access to main urban area
Services
– Larger schools, restaurants & more shops…
Community spirit
– Minimal; divisions between local residents & newcomer commuters
Environment
– Degradation due to house building, transport pollution
Cutnall Green, Worcestershire – case
study for counterurbanisation
• Small village one hour drive from Birmingham
• Grown from 300 to 400 people in last 5 years
1. Read your case study sheet.
2. Has Cutnall Green benefitted from
counterurbanisation? Write a
paragraph to explain your answer.
Cutnall Green has benefitted from
counterurbanisation because....
... However, there are negative effects of
counterurbanisation on Cutnall Green that
include...
... Therefore I conclude that it is a better/worse
place to live because of counterurbanisation
Cutnall Green
London
Plenary – discussion question
Because more people want to live in rural areas due to
counterurbanisation, houses in the countryside are becoming more
expensive. Some local people are struggling to afford to buy in the
villages they grew up in.
Do you think that people who are born in a
rural area should be given special help to be
able to stay there?