Implementation of the Local Control Funding Formula

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Transcript Implementation of the Local Control Funding Formula

Making a Great Local Control and
Accountability Plan
February 14, 2014
WestEd.org
Local Control Funding Formula
• What we know:
• Moves California to a weighted student funding
methodology
• Estimated eight years to full implementation
• Begin in 2013-14, but provisions phase in over time
• There are questions, many questions
• 2014-15 budget outlook is good and Governor has
strongly signaled commitment to LCFF
1
LCFF Important Facts
• LCFF replaces revenue limits and most state
categorical programs
• LCFF is designed to improve student outcomes
• Simplicity to aid in transparency
• Equity through student-focused formula
• Performance through aligned program and
budget plans
• Local flexibility to meet student needs
• LCFF implementation will take time, but begins
now
2
Revisiting LCFF
Greatly simplifies state funding for local educational agencies (LEAs)
ADJUSTMENTS
Grade Level
$
Per Student
Base Amount
Demographics
(Low income, English
Learner, and/or Foster Youth)
3
Changes Made by LCFF
LCFF
Supplemental
provided to
address needs of
English Learners,
low income, and
foster youth
Categorical Funding
for specific purposes
with many rules
Revenue Limit, based
on historical amounts
per student with many
adjustments
Pre-LCFF
LCFF
LCFF Base
Grant is the
same for every
local educational
agency with
adjustments
based on grade
level
4
LCFF Targets –
2013-14 Beginning of Something More
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
LCFF Target
5
LCFF Regulations –
“Increase or Improve Services”
Basic Aid
Funding for Low Income and
English Learner Students
(e.g., Economic Impact Aid)
LCFF
“Gap”
LCFF
Supplemental
LCFF
Supplemental
Categorical
Funding
Revenue
Limit
2012-13
?
Continue
Level of
Effort
How much is
“Base”?
“Supplemental”?
LCFF Base
Grant
LCFF Base
Grant
2013-14
LCFF Target,
2020-21 (est.)
6
LCFF Spending Regulations
• Calculation of proportionality percentage
• Three data sources – LCFF targets, prior year
expenditures, and statewide implementation
percentage
• Clarification of “districtwide, countywide,
charterwide, schoolwide”
• Oversight by county offices of education
7
Sample Unified School District – Proportionality Calculation
2013-14
2014-15*
2015-16**
Repeat for
2016-17 –
2019-20***
2020-21
Estimated Total LCFF
Funding
$113,658,945
$120,009,636
$125,621,700
….
$167,569,262
Estimated Base Grant
N/A
$112,311,872
$115,544,510
….
$139,706,856
Estimated Total of
Supplemental and
Concentration Grants
N/A
$7,697,764
$10,077,190
….
$27,862,406
Proportional increase or
improvement in services for
low income/English
learner/foster youth pupils as
compared to the services
provided to all pupils in that
fiscal year
N/A
6.9%
8.7%
….
20%
* Assuming, for purposes of this hypothetical, that 11.8% of the remaining statewide funding gap between current funding and full
implementation of LCFF is eliminated by additional funding provided in 2014-15.
** While the percentage of the remaining statewide funding gap that is eliminated each year will likely vary, this column again assumes the
percentage is 11.8% for 2015-16 and that Sample USD expended the minimum amount for additional services for LI/EL/FY pupils in 2014-15 (the
estimated total of supplemental and concentration grant funds for that year).
***Assuming annual LCFF funding that allows the state to reach full implementation in 2020-21.
8
LCFF Regulations – Proportionality
Funding for Low Income
and English Learner
Students (e.g., Economic
Impact Aid)
LCFF
“Gap”
LCFF
Supplemental
LCFF
Supplemental
Categorical
Funding
Continue
Level of
Effort
Revenue Limit
2012-13
New LCFF
LCFF
Funding
Supplemental
LCFF Base
Grant
2013-14
11.8% of “Base” Gap
LCFF Base
Grant
LCFF Target,
2020-21
(est.)
9
Implementation Planning
ALIGNMENT OF LCAP WITH CURRENT
DISTRICT PRACTICES
A Plan for LCFF Coherence
Regulations
Templates
Rubric
Define
Clarify key terms and
conditions to support
local implementation
that achieves LCFF
implementation
objectives
Organize and
Communicate
Demonstrate through the
development and sharing
of the LCAP that local
implementation supports
LCFF implementation
objectives and regulations
Assess and Indicate Assistance
Provide a process for assessing
performance and identifying
assistance based on review of
the LCAP that meets specific
areas of need related to LCFF
implementation objectives and
regulations
Connecting Elements/Guiding Principles
 Performance-focused – relationship between plans, funding use, and outcomes for
students
 Simplicity and transparency
 Student-focused – local identification of needs, provides equitable opportunity
 State priorities – define metrics, but rely on local determination of measurement
 Stakeholder Engagement – parents, community, educators
10
Some Big Questions
• How does this affect district and school
planning?
• What and how will the Local Control and
Accountability Plan be used?
• What consequences will exist?
• What type of intervention assistance will be
offered or required?
11
Some Big Questions
• How does my district approach multi year
planning?
• How much will my district receive in 2014-15?
• How does a district approach site allocations?
• How does LCFF impact the use of federal funds?
• What’s “base” for state and local funding?
12
The Biggest Question of All
• How does LCFF change our ability to meet
student needs?
• For some, translates into more funding
• Allows for more flexibility in use of Economic
Impact Aid
» But, needs of low income and English Learners still
must be met
13
As you begin to implement…
• Consider:
• How will you track use of funds?
• How much is attributable to “unduplicated pupils”?
• What are your 2-3 talking points to communicate
information about LCFF to:
• School Board
• Principals
• Parents and Community
14
Local Control and Accountability
Plan
• Williams requirements
• Implementation of the academic content and
performance standards adopted by SBE
• Parental involvement
• Pupil achievement
• Pupil engagement
• School climate
• The extent to which pupils have access to, and
are enrolled in, a broad course of study
• And, pupil outcomes, if available, in the subject
areas comprising a broad course of study.
15
Local Control and Accountability
Plan
• Encourages telling a story of support,
impact, and improvement
• Emphasis on good planning,
communication, and engagement
• Organization:
• Stakeholder Engagement
• Goals and Progress Indicators
• Actions, Services, and Expenditures
16
Local Control Accountability Plan
EXAMPLE: Preparation Activities
17
Performance Based Thinking
• LCFF is an opportunity (and possibly an incentive)
to implement a performance based budget
• Fund that which contributes most to performance
• How do we currently factor in
performance to our budgeting?
• What would it look like to plan for
performance?
• Procedures
• Culture
• Budget
18
Keys to Performance-Based
Budgeting
• Data with analysis
• Persistence
• Understanding of planning and performance
assumptions
• Theory of action, logic model, etc.
19
Keys to Performance-Based
Budgeting
• Criteria for evaluation
• Starting with priorities and values
• Expectations
• Information to evaluate
• Stakeholder engagement
• Simplicity over complexity
20
Planning, Communicating and Engaging
DEVELOPING YOUR DISTRICT LCAP
Mapping a Course With LCFF
• Are we ready to work together?
• Understanding of roles, responsibilities, and
expectations
• What are the needs, goals, and actions that will
change outcomes for students?
• Are we aiming for involvement or engagement?
• What information and support is needed to be
engaged?
21
District Planning Cycle
Adoption of
Vision/Story &
Goals
Assessment of Needs
and Capacity
Identification of Desired
Outcomes for Students
Celebration of Success and
Appropriate Modifications
Monitoring of Progress
Implementation of
Programs and Practices
Identification and
Selection of EvidenceBased Services and
Actions
Identification of Metrics
for Measuring Progress
Expenditure Decisions to
Support Services and Actions
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Clearly Communicate
•
•
•
•
•
Planning process goals, activities, and timeline
Any specific decision-making parameters
Who will participate in a core Planning
Coordination Team
Who will facilitate the process
The basis for stakeholder involvement and
selection
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Clearly Communicate
•
•
•
•
Expectations for stakeholder contributions
The decision-making process and authority
Ways of raising constructive questions or
concerns
Progress made over time
24
Authentic Engagement
• Requires us to be purposeful in order to answer;
• To what end do we plan to engage people?”
• What do we hope to achieve?
• Based on what contributions?
25
Authentic Engagement
• Establish what mode(s) of communication are
most appropriate to the planning process:
• Dissemination: transmit information or new
meaning
• Dialogue: build understanding and explore
assumptions
• Discussion: form plans, interpret information, and
solve problems
• Collaboration: co-produce or create something in
a group or across organizations
• Deliberation: weigh options and make decisions
26
Authentic Engagement
• Authentic engagement provides the ability to
see and articulate why a plan was different
because of stakeholder engagement
• In other words, authentic engagement reflects
that stakeholder contributions matter
27
Stakeholder Engagement
Establish and communicate expectations for
example:
•
•
•
•
Stakeholders—especially parents and community
members—will become knowledgeable about
how LCFF/LCAP is likely to change student
opportunities
School leaders and stakeholders are clear about
what contributions stakeholders can/should
make to support the LCAP process
Stakeholders contribute in concrete ways at
specific points in the LCAP process (e.g.,
interpreting student data/experiences, making
suggestions, providing feedback)
28
Don’t Ask Stakeholders for Input You
Don’t Have a Plan for Using!
29
Team Activity
DEVELOP A STAKEHOLDER
INVOLVEMENT TIMELINE
Creating Vision
• A district’s vision statement establishes the
“ideal” state that a district hopes to help achieve
• It should also be the “north star” that provides
the long-term direction and inspiration for the
district
38
Some Questions?
• What will this district contribute to the lives of
students, families, communities, employers, and
society more generally?
• What is the story about how students will
succeed in the future?
30
Indentifying Priorities
• A priority is a fundamental issue the district
chooses to address
• Priorities provide direction for how to pursue a
larger, more abstract vision
• Although priorities may represent desired ends, they
are not necessarily attainable or quantifiable
• Priorities represent the intermediate picture of
“where” the district is going
31
Process
Point
Expected
Stakeholder
Contributions (based
Stakeholders Selection
Process
Identify and share any
existing vision and
priorities for the District;
formally adopt vision and
priorities
School Board
(with
Superintendent
support)
on knowledge,
experience, role, and
interests)
Adoption of
Vision and
Priorities
Stakeholder
Information
Needs
Identify and communicate Planning
parameters or criteria that Coordination
shape—or should shape— Team
the District’s vision and
priorities (e.g., federal and
state requirements, prior
commitments, community
demographics, etc.).
Completed By: ______________
32
Assessment of Gaps and Capacity
• Don’t focus on what you already know…..
Surprise yourself!
• This may mean:
•
•
•
•
Asking different questions—ask three questions
you’ve never asked before
Looking at different kinds of data
Bringing new people into the room
Analyzing data differently
33
Indentifying Outcome
• Outcomes are clear, concrete statements of the
changes a district aims to make in support of
student success
• Outcomes represent “what” the district is trying
to accomplish
• What, specifically, will be improved for students?
• What will they be able to do differently?
34
Process
Point
Expected
Stakeholder
Contributions (based
on knowledge,
experience, role, and
interests)
Stakeholders Selection
Process
Stakeholder
Information
Needs
Identification
of Desired
Outcomes
Completed By: ______________
35
Identifying Strategies
• Strategies are either:
• Evidence-based
• A promising program or practice
• Strategies are not highly detailed tasks, but
programs or practices adopted based on
evidence about how they are likely to support
desired outcomes for students
36
Identifying Strategies
• Strategies should guide decisions about
resource allocation (time/attention, money,
expertise, etc.)
• What major steps will be taken?
• Who will take them?
37
Process
Point
Expected
Stakeholder
Contributions (based
on knowledge,
experience, role, and
interests)
Stakeholders Selection
Process
Stakeholder
Information
Needs
Identification
& Selection
of EvidenceBased or
Promising
Programs &
Practices
Completed By: ______________
38
Progress Indicators
• Progress indicators are statements about what
districts will measure to determine:
• How well their efforts/strategies are achieving
desired outcomes for students
• To what extent they are implementing key
strategies in an effective manner
39
Process
Point
Expected
Stakeholder
Contributions (based
on knowledge,
experience, role, and
interests)
Stakeholders
Selection
Process
Stakeholder
Information
Needs
Identification
of Progress
Indicators
Completed By: ______________
40
Team Activity
TAKE STOCK OF CURRENT PLANS FOR
ALIGNMENT TO STATE PRIORITIES
Strategic Planning Activity
Strategic Planning Template
Priority: ____________________________________________________________________
1. Which stakeholders will need to work together most closely to address this priority?
2. What are the outcomes (concrete results or changes) that will help you succeed in relationship to this priority? What key strategies will need
to be taken over the next year to support these outcomes? Who should be responsible for taking these actions?
Outcome
Strategies/Actions
Responsible Parties
Timeframe
Outcome
Strategies/Actions
Responsible Parties
Timeframe
41
Team Activity
DISCUSS/DEVELOP A METHODOLOGY
TO PRIORITIZE LCAP GOALS
The Role of Management and
Leadership
• We often find that sound plans are in place with
reasonable budgets, yet the change fails to yield
results because of a failure of implementation
• This is not a planning or budgeting problem, but a
management and leadership problem
• Management involves paying attention to the
tactical needs of a strategic plan
• Getting people to change what they do in
support of students, requires leadership
42
Report Out
1. What did your group accomplish?
2. What questions remain?
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For More Information
lcff.wested.org
www.cde.ca.gov
Ann Hern
[email protected]
Ginni Davis
[email protected]
Laura Lara-Brady
[email protected]
Jannelle Kubinec
[email protected]
WestEd.org