Overview of Adult Community Corrections

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Transcript Overview of Adult Community Corrections

Overview of Adult Community
Corrections
Outline
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Organizational Structure
Probation population breakdown
Evidence Based Practices in Probation
Probation Revocations
Specialized Caseloads and Problem Solving
Courts
Organizational Structure
Harold “Bud” Doughty
Associate Commissioner for
Adult Services
Probation Region I
Lisa Nash, Regional
Corrections Administrator
Probation Region II
Probation Region III
Probation Region IV
Nancy Downs, Regional
Corrections Administrator
Dan Ouelette, Regional
Corrections Administrator
Charles O’Roake, Regional
Corrections Administrator
Bangor
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Auburn
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Adult Community Services
Region 1
Region 2
Region 3
Region 4
Regional Organization
74 Probation Officers Statewide
Caseload & Offender Data
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74 Probation Officers
Average caseload size is 97 total / 84
Active*
7628 offenders total; 6324 active
*Average includes smaller specialized caseloads and
assumes no vacancies
Active Probation Population (6324 total)
Probation
612
159
14
Parole
535
Pending Violation
Incarcerated
11
Interstate In
4993
Pending Violation
Community
SCCP
Statewide Gender Breakdown
Percent of Female Offenders
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
Total
40%
Female
30%
20%
10%
0%
Region I
(19%)
Region II
(16%)
Region III
(18%)
Region IV
(20%)
Evidence Based Practices in
Probation
Changing Strategies/Practices to Achieve
Same Goal… Public Safety
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Still pursuing Public Safety but a wide body of
research/evidence now supports different
approach to achieve public safety.
Doing “What Works” and supported by research
to achieve public safety by reducing recidivism)
Small reductions of risk across a broadscale of
offenders.
Examples of Evidence Based
Practices in Probation
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Identification of Risk by Assessment
Vary supervision intensity, programming,
and strategy by identify risks and needs
Use Motivational Interviewing
Formalized case planning
Quality Assurance
Identification of Risk by Assessment
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Level of Service Inventory –Revised(LSI-R)
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Perhaps the most widely used offender assessment
instrument:
(Andrew,Bonta)
A 1999 national study found that 14% of agencies surveyed were using
the LSI-R and another 6% had plans to implement its use.
Jones, D.A., Johnson, S., Latessa, E.J., and Travis, L.F. (1999). Case classification in
community corrections: Preliminary findings from a national survey. Topics in
Community Corrections. Washington D.C.: National Institute of Corrections, U.S. Dept.
of Justice.
LSI-R
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Perhaps the most researched correctional
risk/needs assessment
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Since the first validation in 1982 it has continued
to show predictive validity.
Andrews, D.A. (1982). The Level of Supervision Inventory (LSI): the first
follow-up: Toronto: Ontario Ministry of Correctional Services
Andrews, D.A., Dowden, C. and Gendreau, P. (1999). Clinically relevant and
psychologically informed approaches to reduced re-offending: A metaanalytic study of human service, risk, need, responsivity and other concerns
in justice contexts. Ottawa: Carleton University
Probation Population Risk Levels
Population Breakdown by Risk
Risk: Defined as likelihood of recidivating as
defined by the Level of Service Inventory –
Revised(LSI-R)
Categories:
Administrative (0-13)
Low (14-20)
Moderate (21-25)
High (26-34)
Maximum (35-50)
Statewide Risk Breakdown
Statewide Risk Breakdown
10%
2%
13%
12%
26%
37%
Admin 13%
Mod 37%
Max 2%
Low 26%
High 12%
Unassessed 10%
Population Breakdown by Risk
Populations by LSI-R Risk
100%
80%
60%
40%
20%
0%
Reg I Reg II Reg III Reg IV State
Avg
Admin
Low
Mod
High
Max
Unassessed
Probation Revocations
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Account for a significant percentage of
DOC and County Jail incarcerations
A significant percentage of probation
revocations are the result of technical
violations
What influences revocation
decisions?
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Risk
Probation Officers
District Attorneys
Judges
Severity and/or number of violations
Victim impact
Revocation Reduction Measures
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Directive requiring supervisory review of cases with
pending violations where revocations in excess of 90
days being sought.
Pilot program in York County where LSI-R risk level and
case history is being provided directly to the court for all
probation violations.
Plans for the creation of a “Technical Violations Unit”
and/or a “Probation Re-entry Program” modeled after
successful programs in Connecticut.
Problem Solving Courts
Problem-Solving Courts
Courts taking innovative approaches with specific problems
that cause criminal behavior such as substance abuse,
mental health, and domestic violence. Problem solving
courts in Maine include:
 Drug
Court
 Mental Health Court
 Judicial Monitoring for Domestic
Violence Offenders
Specialist Caseloads
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Domestic Violence Specialist Caseloads
(York and Cumberland Counties)
Sex Offender Specialist Caseloads – in all
4 probation regions
Supervised Community Confinement*
*specialist caseloads in some areas