Drive Right Chapters 12 and 13

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Transcript Drive Right Chapters 12 and 13

Drive Right
Unit 7
Chapters 14 and 15
Period 2
Driver Education
Mr. Miller’s
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.1 Emotions and Driving
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Emotions influence the way you think and act.
They can affect the way you normally assess risk.
Minimize the effects of emotions by being courteous.
Increase the space between themselves and the
vehicle ahead to reduce risk when emotional.
Strong emotions also can cause changes in your
bodily functions.
Your heart races, breathing quickens, digestion
slows and muscles tighten up.
Rush hour traffic and bumper to bumper congestion
can certainly cause stressful emotions.
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.1 Emotions and Driving
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You might be tempted to react angrily when you are
driving in stressful situations.
Anger occurs more often to drivers than any other
emotion.
It can range from mild irritation to furious rage and
can result in aggressive actions or even violent acts
of “ROAD RAGE”.
Some people believe that “road rage” is as
dangerous as drunk driving.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILRSnIwARac
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txVZhepSe1Y&feature=related
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition

14.1 Emotions and Driving
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Your emotions can drastically affect your driving
ability.
When you use the IPDE process your emotions can
keep you from making the wrong decision.
Peer pressure can be a strong force with emotions.
In a vehicle, your passengers can strongly influence
the way you drive.
When you are driving, you must be a leader and
take control. You are responsible for the safety of
your passengers.
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition

14.1 Emotions and Driving
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A passenger can assist a driver by:
 Avoid saying or doing anything that might distract
or upset the driver.
 Refrain from heated discussions.
 Talk about positive events.
 Discourage the driver from reckless actions.
 Be prepared to intervene if the driver endangers
others by reckless driving.
 Encourage the driver to let someone else drive, or
refuse to ride in the same vehicle.
 Do what you must to protect yourself and others.
 Compliment the driver for doing a good job driving.
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition

14.1 Emotions and Driving
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Emotions have a big influence on the risk taking.
If you are angry, you will probably take more risks.
Mature, responsible drivers do not let their emotions
make them take unnecessary risks.
You must also be mature enough not to join others
when they suggest risk taking activities.
Coping with stress and holding back your emotions
until it is safe to vent is important.
You must strive to keep your emotions from
affecting your driving ability.
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.1 Emotions and Driving
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Coping with emotions:
 Use the IPDE process to drive in an organized
manner. Learn and use correct driving procedures
until they become habits.
 You will then be more likely to execute the proper
action, even when under emotional stress.
 Anticipate emotion-producing situations, and adjust
your expectations.
 If you encounter an aggressive driver – don’t
challenge them. Adopt a yield attitude.
 Analyze your mistakes and learn from them.
 Keep “courtesy” as on of your personal rules of the
road.
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.2 Physical Senses and Driving
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More than 90% of the information you gather while
driving is received through your eyes.
When driving you will need the ability to see things
clearly both near and far. Seeing gauges or street
signs are equally important. This ability to see
things clearly is called visual acuity.
Not being able to distinguish colors is called color
blindness. If you are color blind you can
compensate by:
 Remembering the order of the lights in traffic.
 Knowing the meaning of signs by their shape.
 Reading all signs and checking all zones.
 Taking cues from other drivers.
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.2 Physical Senses and Driving
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Your field of visions should allow you to see ahead of
your vehicle and approximately 90 degrees to each
side or about a half circle.
However, you can only see clearly straight ahead in
the area of central vision.
This straight ahead vision is only 10 degrees and
cone shaped.
Surrounding your central vision is your peripheral
vision.
The farther away from the central vision, the less
clear the view.
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.2 Physical Senses and Driving
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Depth Perception is the ability to judge distance
between yourself and other objects.
Drivers can compensate for poor depth perception
by:
 Using a following distance greater than 3 seconds.
 Allowing for additional clear distance ahead before
passing.
 Allowing greater distance at night than at daytime.
 Darkness hides many guides you use in the
daytime.
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.2 Physical Senses and Driving
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The ability to see at night varies from person to
person.
Not being able to see well at night is called night
blindness.
All people see less at night than in daylight.
Colors are harder to see at night.
Your night vision is also limited to the area lit by
headlights, streetlights and other lights.
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.2 Physical Senses and Driving
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You increase or decrease your risk of becoming
involved in a collision by changing the level of
control you have over your vehicle.
Anything that distracts you from using your senses
and concentrating on the driving task will increase
your risk of a collision.
A stereo system in your vehicle can cause
distractions, also it can be helpful if used safely.
Avoid changing stations, tapes, and cd’s while
driving.
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.2 Physical Senses and Driving
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Cell phones can be helpful in an emergency, but they
are dangerous to use while driving.
Research studies have found that drivers talking on
a cell phone were four times more likely to be
involved in a collision.
You should turn off your cell phone while driving.
If you need to use the phone, pull off the road and
stop the car.
Other distractions can come from pets in the car.
Pets need to be placed in carriers or secured with
special harnesses.
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.3 Physical Disabilities
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Sometimes you must drive even though you are not
at your physical best.
Mental or physical work, emotional stress or loss of
sleep can cause fatigue.
Fatigue lessens your fitness to perform tasks.
It dulls your senses and slows both mental and
physical processes.
If you are fatigued, you will need more time to use
the IPDE process.
Drowsy driving is estimated to cause at least
100,000 collisions a year.
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.3 Physical Disabilities
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There are several signs of drowsiness:
 Trouble keeping your head up.
 Drifting between lane positions.
 Wandering, disconnected thoughts.
 Inability to stop yawning.
 Eyes closing or going out of focus.
 Inability to concentrate on driving task.
Most people biologically prefer to sleep between
12:00am and 6:00am, and again around 2:00pm.
Be Cautious!!
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.3 Physical Disabilities
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Rest is the only safe remedy for fatigue.
Sometimes it is necessary to drive even if you are tired.
Take these actions to deal with fatigue:
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Rest before you start driving.
Change drivers often.
Stop every two hours. Walk, stretch, get a beverage or
snack, or take a nap on long trips.
Wear sunglasses in bright sunlight and to shield against
snow glare.
Use your orderly visual search pattern to keep your eyes
moving.
Be active – listen to the radio, sing, or talk to passengers.
Stop in safe, well-lighted place if you feel drowsy. Lock
the vehicle and take a nap.
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.3 Physical Disabilities
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Any illness, even a cold, can impair driving to some
extent.
A temporary physical injury, such as a broken bone
or a sprained ankle, also can impair your driving.
They can cause discomfort and pain, limit physical
movement, lessen endurance and strength, or dull
your senses.
Many medicines have side effects that can interfere
with your driving ability and risks.
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.3 Physical Disabilities
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If you take medicine, consider these points before
you drive:
 Read the label to learn the possible side effects.
 Ask you physician or pharmacist about side effects.
 A medicine can affect you differently at different
times.
 If possible, drive to your destination and then take
your medicine.
 If you must take your medicine and drive, try to
choose a quiet, less congested route.
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.3 Physical Disabilities
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Your vehicle’s exhaust fumes contain carbon
monoxide.
Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless and
tasteless gas.
Small amounts of carbon monoxide can cause
drowsiness, headaches, muscular weakness, mental
dullness and nausea.
Too much carbon monoxide can cause death!!
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Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.3 Physical Disabilities
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Take these steps to prevent carbon monoxide exposure
and combat its effect:
 If you vehicle is parked in a garage – open door.
 Avoid running the engine inside the garage.
 In traffic, stop behind vehicles so you can see the back
tires.
 In traffic jams, especially in enclosed areas, turn off
your engine when possible.
 Check your exhaust system regularly.
 Do not drive with the rear windows open.
 Move a person who is overcome with carbon monoxide
into fresh air.
 Call 911!!
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.3 Physical Disabilities
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Smoking while driving is dangerous.
Smoking raises the carbon monoxide level in a
person’s blood.
Smoke residue accumulates on windows and affects
vision.
Discourage your passengers from smoking.
Carbon monoxide from tobacco smoke can affect
even non-smokers in an enclosed car.
If someone does smoke, open a window to provide
fresh air for your car.
Chapter 14
Effects of Driver Condition
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14.3 Physical Disabilities
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Special vehicle equipment and controls can make it
possible for many people with permanent disabilities
to drive.
Others with less disabilities can control their
disabilities with medication.
Older drivers are using the roadways more today
than ever before.
One in six drivers is over 65.
80% of drivers age 75 take prescription medication.
Aging slows reflexes, dulls vision and concentration,
can make muscles weaker and inflexible, and
reduces depth perception and field of vision.
Chapter 15
Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Driving
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15.1 Effects of Alcohol on Driving Safely
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Alcohol is the most commonly used drug in our
society.
It is the most commonly found drug in fatally injured
drivers.
Young people in their teens are among those in our
society who use and abuse alcohol.
Even though it’s illegal for teens to drink, a
significant percentage of them do drink.
This percentage of teens who drink alcohol presents
a major problem for highway traffic safety when
they mix drinking with driving.
Chapter 15
Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Driving
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15.1 Effects of Alcohol on Driving Safely
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The effects of alcohol vary from person to person.
One of the most serious problems of alcohol is the
problem of the drinking driver.
Drivers cannot afford to increase the risks of driving by
having their abilities diminished by alcohol.
Facts about alcohol and driving:
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Young drinking drivers are involved in fatal crashes at
twice the rate of drivers aged 21 and older.
Drivers aged 16 through 20 are more likely to be alcoholimpaired than any other age group.
Nearly half of those killed in alcohol-related collisions had
not been drinking but were victims of drunk drivers.
More than half of all fatalities during holidays are alcohol
related.
Chapter 15
Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Driving
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15.1 Effects of Alcohol on Driving Safely
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As soon as alcohol from a drink reaches the brain, it
affects the way people think and behave.
Just one drink can affect a person’s behavior, both
mentally and physically, regardless of the type of
alcoholic drink.
Alcohol acts on the central nervous system like an
anesthetic, slowing the activity of the brain.
It is not digested. It is absorbed directly into the
bloodstream through the walls and linings of the
entire digestive tract.
Once alcohol enters the bloodstream, it quickly flows
to the brain.
Chapter 15
Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Driving

15.1 Effects of Alcohol on Driving Safely
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Alcohol has the greatest effect on the parts of the
brain that control judgment and reasoning.
These are the two most critical mental skills needed
by drivers.
Physical abilities become impaired soon afterward.
A driver affected by alcohol has a decreased ability
to reason clearly and make sound judgments.
A person in this condition can develop a false feeling
of well-being.
This feeling is known as euphoria. People in a
euphoric state of mind may take chances they
normally would not take.
Chapter 15
Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Driving

15.1 Effects of Alcohol on Driving Safely
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Alcohol weakens a person’s inhibitions, the inner
forces of personality that restrain or hold back one’s
impulsive behavior.
Alcohol slows reflexes and reaction time. Muscular
coordination becomes slow and clumsy.
One of the most dangerous effects of alcohol is
impaired vision. Impairment occurs in visual acuity,
peripheral vision, night vision, color vision and depth
perception.
As a person continues to drink, the center of the
brain that controls breathing and heartbeat can
become impaired.
Chapter 15
Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Driving

15.1 Effects of Alcohol on Driving Safely
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Long term use of alcohol can lead to alcoholism.
Alcoholism is a major problem in our society. Not
only for the problem drinker, but for the families and
communities as well.
The amount of alcohol in a person’s bloodstream can
be measured by chemical tests.
This amount of alcohol is called “blood-alcohol
concentration” (BAC).
The level of intoxication is determined by the
percent of alcohol in the bloodstream.
Each drink adds about .02 to .03 percent to the
person’s BAC.
Chapter 15
Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Driving

15.1 Effects of Alcohol on Driving Safely
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Factors that affect a person’s BAC:
 Amount of alcohol consumed.
 Amount of time over which a given amount of
alcohol is consumed.
 Person’s body weight
 Some types of food in the stomach may make a
difference in the rate of alcohol is absorbed.
 When a person consumes alcohol in a carbonated
beverage, the rate of absorption is even faster.
Chapter 15
Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Driving

15.1 Effects of Alcohol on Driving Safely
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Alcohol is absorbed into the brain very quickly, but it
is very slow to leave.
Alcohol continues to circulate throughout the body
until it is oxidized and removed by the liver.
The body rids itself of alcohol at a rate of about
three-fourths of a standard drink an hour.
A person who has one drink needs about one and a
half hours to rid the body of the alcohol in that
drink.
Only time can reduce the body’s BAC and that
person’s degree of impairment.
Chapter 15
Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Driving

15.1 Effects of Alcohol on Driving Safely
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Myths about alcohol:
 Coffee, cold shower or doing exercise can sober
up a person who has been drinking.
One little drink wont hurt me.
 I will not be affected because I am only
drinking beer.
 I can drive better after a few drinks.
 A young person cannot become a problem
drinker.
If you do decide to drink, always appoint a
designated driver ahead of time.
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Chapter 15
Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Driving
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15.2 Other Drugs and Driving
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Besides alcohol, there are many other types of drugs
that are legal and illegal.
Most drugs are classified according to the effects
they have on the central nervous system and bodily
functions.
Over the counter medicines, prescription medicines,
depressants, stimulants, hallucinogens are all
varieties of legal and illegal drugs.
Chapter 15
Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Driving
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15.3 Traffic Laws Governing the Use of Alcohol
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All 50 states have become uniform in requiring a
person to be 21 to purchase or consume alcohol.
Every state has an implied consent law for drivers.
Because there is no safe amount of alcohol for
drivers, all states have set a BAC level at which
drivers could be charged with a DUI (.08 percent).
Penalties for conviction
 Suspension or revocation of driver’s license.
 Payment of fines.
 Serving a prison term
Chapter 15
Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Driving

15.3 Traffic Laws Governing the Use of Alcohol
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Zero tolerance law makes it illegal for persons under
the age of 21 to drive with any measurable amount
of alcohol in the blood.
Tests for intoxication include chemical testing and
field sobriety testing.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RAlCt_o4rVQ
Chapter 15
Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Driving

15.4 Coping with Peer Pressure
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The influence of others of a similar age is called peer
pressure.
Positive peer pressure – they want to be helpful.
Negative peer pressure – encourage you to do
something that is wrong or dangerous.
Peer education is one method used by school
districts to help young people make positive
decisions.
Peer education help influence other young people to
be influenced in a positive way.
Actions you can take: investigate facts, get the word
out, communicate your support, and work with
other local communities in a positive way.