Dual Credit in Illinois - IBHE- Home

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Transcript Dual Credit in Illinois - IBHE- Home

Dual Credit in Illinois
Debra D. Bragg, Professor, University of
Illinois
Presentation for the
Illinois Dual Credit Task Force
Overview
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Claims
Context
Terminology
Implementation
Results
Next Steps
Questions
Claims
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Increases curriculum options for high
school students
Addresses “senioritis”
Motivates high school students to
prepare for college
Improves college readiness (reduces
remediation)
Increases access to college
Reduces cost of attendance
Reduces time to degree
National Study (Clark, 2001)
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“Dual credit is both loved and hated…
Some have strong investments in its
success; others have equally strong
investments in its failure. There is very
little neutral ground.” (p. 5)
Context
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One of a number of “academic
pathways” to college
Most states offer some form of dual
credit/enrollment
Community college – high school
agreements are most common
Both academic and career-technical
education (CTE) courses offer dual
credit
Terminology
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Dual or concurrent enrollment –
emphasis on enrollment -- high school
students simultaneously enroll in high
school and take college courses
Dual credit – emphasis on credit high school students receive high school
credit and college credit for a collegelevel course successfully completed
Articulated credit – high school
course may qualify students for college
credit by exam or subsequent
successful college coursework (deferred
Implementation
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Secondary – postsecondary
collaboration
Program quality – “college” level
Results -- Student outcomes
Teacher qualifications
Adequate funding
State policy vs. local autonomy
Processes for awarding credit
Student selection
Dual Credit Delphi Study for the State of Illinois
Marketing to students and parents
(OCCRL, 2001-2002)
University Admissions & Dual
Credit (2004)
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All public and most private accept dual credit –
through community college transfer
Driver: student demand
Lack of written policy, clear information (“word of
mouth” most common)
Implementation concerns:
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Accredited institution
College level course
Student performance
Credit toward major vs elective
Makela, J. P. (2005, August). Current practices and policies on dual credit
admissions in Illinois’ four-year colleges and universities. )
Results
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More college credits, better semester-to-semester
retention, higher college GPA
Enhanced college “readiness” (typically math courses
not required for dual credit courses in other academic
subjects and CTE)
Increased degree attainment, but…
Some sorting:
 CTE dual credits -> community college
enrollment
 Academic dual credits –> four-year college
enrollment
References available upon request
Next Steps
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Provide support
Address issues
Collect better data
Integrate into larger systems
“Program of Study”
Six Principles & Design Elements
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Leadership, organization and support - Visionary leaders
and collaborative partners.
Access and opportunity - Access to educational
opportunities and services that enable student success.
Alignment and transition - Student transition through the
educational pipeline.
Enhanced curriculum and instruction – Rigorous and
relevant instruction and career development that enhances
learning and enables students to attain credentials.
Professional preparation and development - Teacher
preparation, recruitment of qualified instructional staff, and
quality professional development.
Accountability and program improvement – Data are
used to demonstrate accountability and improve outcomes.
Questions
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?
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Contact
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Debra Bragg, University of Illinois
Office of Community College Research
and Leadership (OCCRL)
Phone: 217-244-9390
Website: http://occrl.ed.uiuc.edu
Email: [email protected]