Mentorship and Teaching 2013-2014

download report

Transcript Mentorship and Teaching 2013-2014

Mentorship and Teaching 2013-2014

S

Mentorship

“All teachers are more effective when they can learn from and are supported by a strong community of colleagues…new teachers can benefit greatly by having a mentor who will be a guide and coach.”

- Fullan and Hargreaves, 1999

S

Why Mentorship?

These words, written by a beginning teacher, speak to the challenges that teachers new to the profession face: –

BEGINNING TEACHER

Learning from Experience: Supporting Beginning Teachers and Mentors, Ontario College of Teachers

What is Mentorship?

Mentorship Programs are a consistent theme within the field of Education: Ontario Ministry of Education

The New Teacher Induction Program (NTIP) research has shown that the first year of teaching is one of the most challenging periods of a teacher’s career. Through the NTIP, you will have the opportunity to work directly with, and benefit from, an experienced teacher as a consultant, a coach and a colleague.

Partnering for Success: Getting the most from Ontario’s New Teacher Induction Program. A Resource Handbook for New Teachers Ontario Ministry of Education New Teacher Induction Program

What is Mentorship?

Ontario Ministry of Education

Most teachers who have experienced mentoring programs have found that they provide a wide range of benefits including: • • • • • a support system they can rely on throughout the year; the opportunity to observe and work with an experienced teacher; a means of building new skills and accelerating professional learning; a source of constructive feedback; a sounding board for discussing questions, issues and concerns; and increased comfort and self-confidence.

Partnering for Success: Getting the most from Ontario’s New Teacher Induction Program. A Resource Handbook for New Teachers Ontario Ministry of Education New Teacher Induction Program

Nipissing Peer Mentorship Program Teacher Candidate Observations 2012-2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXvB7HrpAp4&feat ure=em-upload_owner

M E N T O R S H I P

Essential Characteristics of Effective Mentoring and Teaching

Mutual Evolving Non-evaluative Trusting Open Real Supported Honours strengths Invitational Personalized

I

Taking responsibility and supporting student growth

E

Energetic and enthusiastic- not only standing in front of the classroom… it’s working with individuals, small groups and other teachers

A C H N G

Active and Collaborative- NOT isolated. You are a member of a learning community Collegial- it is a shared endeavour- co-planning and co-teaching as advocated by the Ministry of Education Holistic- built on relationships with students, parents, teaching colleagues and other staff members Interesting- Presents unique and interesting daily challenges Networking and Mentorship-work with others to learn and teach Growth-promoting personal and professional growth

NU Mentorship Model

Novice

First Year Teacher Candidate

Mentor

Upper Year Teacher Candidate

   The model is based on research findings supporting the benefits of Mentors in the development of Teacher Candidates.

Paired practicum experiences are prevalent in other universities and are effective in providing increased support for teacher candidates.

Nipissing Brantford’s concept of pairing Novice and Mentor concurrent education Teacher Candidates in the same practicum is an innovative model in Ontario.

How It Works…

Novice

First Year Teacher Candidate

Mentor

Upper Year Teacher Candidate

E ACH N OVICE WILL BE PLACED WITH A M ENTOR FROM AN UPPER YEAR OF THE PROGRAM (Y EAR 2 OR 3) T HE PAIRS WILL IDEALLY BE PLACED WITHIN THE SAME CLASSROOM IF NOT IN THE SAME SCHOOL T HERE ARE SOME EXCEPTIONS DUE TO A VARIETY OF REASONS I N THESE CASES , PAIRS SHOULD STILL COMMUNICATE REGULARLY AND VISIT EACH OTHER ’ S CLASSROOMS AT LEAST ONCE N OTE : M ENTORS BEGAN THEIR PLACEMENTS IN O CTOBE R R OLES …  T EACHER CANDIDATES   A SSOCIATE T EACHER F ACULTY ADVISOR

Meeting your Mentor

Let’s Chat!

S How will you establish consistent communication with your Mentor and Associate Teacher?

S Why is it important to build a relationship with your Mentor?

S What questions would you like to ask your Mentor?

S Class routines, schedules, students with IEP’s

Contacting your Mentor

• • • • • Exchange contact information (Nipissing e-mail and an alternate e-mail address, Facebook, Phone number, Address) Where are you placed? (Mentorship Scenario) Transportation- How do you get to Practicum?

Classroom Overview – Associate Teacher, Students, Challenges, Classroom Management First day of Practicum

Benefits

Enhanced opportunities for collaborative planning, teaching, and reflection, and resource sharing Support offered by peers in addressing the concurrent education program expectations Increased awareness of teacher candidate expectations for both the Novice and the Mentor Supported by the Ontario College of Teachers and The Ministry of Education S

Expectations Novice

First Year Teacher Candidate

S Become familiar with the classroom expectations and environment in the second term of the practicum S How?

S Become familiar with the strengths and interests of the Mentor S How?

S Observe and learn by asking questions, sharing ideas and resources with Mentor S What does this look like?

S Reflect and set personal goals S What goals might you set? How will you know you’ve achieved these goals?

S Provide feedback and reflections to the Mentor based on observations S How might you provide feedback?

Co-plan and co-teach with the Mentor as much as possible How will you do this?

Plan and teach some lessons independently and seek feedback from the Mentor How?

Maintain ongoing contact with the Mentor What strategies or methods of communication might you use?

Collaborate with the Associate Teacher and the Mentor How will you collaborate effectively and regularly?

Facilitate the development of the Mentor How will you help your Mentor be successful?

Co-planning and Co-teaching

• Determine lessons to be taught together or independently, in consultation with the Associate Teacher • • Determine roles in co-teaching Examples: 1) Gathering and recording student responses 2) Proximity control 3) Assisting with application activities Utilize individual strengths (e.g., music, drama, science) • Balance and negotiate individual responsibilities

FAQ

Q: When does the Peer Mentorship Model begin?

A: The Mentor begins the practicum in their assigned classroom in mid-

October. The first year Novice begins the practicum in January, joining the mentor in their assigned classroom. The mentorship pair works together throughout the second term, with guidance from the Associate Teacher and Faculty Advisor. If the Novice and Mentor are not placed in the same practicum setting, the mentorship pair can still learn from each other and engage in meaningful dialogue by sharing practicum planning, teaching, management and assessment strategies. It is also recommended that Mentor and Novice candidates who are not placed in the same classroom cross-visit each other’s placements and observe one another teach at least once in the winter term.

FAQ

Q: If the mentor and novice are in the same classroom, what are the expectations of the Peer Mentorship Model? (How many lessons should Teacher Candidates teach independently and co-plan/co-teach each day?) A: Mentor expectations (Year 2 and Year 3 Teacher Candidates): The Teacher

Candidate Program Handbook outlines that each year 2 and 3 mentor Teacher Candidate should teach at least one independent lesson per practicum day. A second lesson can be taught by the mentor-novice team or by the novice with input from the mentor.

Novice expectations (Year 1 Teacher Candidates):

The Novice year one Teacher Candidate should have the experience of teaching some independent lessons by the end of the practicum. Teacher Candidates are reminded that ‘teaching’ also includes planning and assisting small group instruction, setting up learning centres and working with individual students, in addition to directed lesson plans.

FAQ

Q: What is the expected course of action if mentors or novices are experiencing difficulty working as a mentorship pair?

A: Novices and Mentors are expected to work together as professionals as in

other mentorship situations. They should initially problem solve and negotiate their roles with the Associate Teacher. If there are further problems, they should contact their Faculty Advisor and the Practicum Office. Novices and mentors will not be moved from their placements unless there are serious problems at which time withdrawal from placement and a failed practicum will result as deemed appropriate by the Practicum Advisory Committee.

Questions or Concerns?

Contact the Practicum Office at [email protected]

or 519 752 1524 ext. 7504