Learning outcomes

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Transcript Learning outcomes

Module design
Setting aims and learning
outcomes
Dr. John Milliken
School of Education
Queens University Belfast
Learning outcomes
If you don’t know
where you’re
going,
You’ll probably
end up
somewhere else.
(Campbell 1984)
Context of the Workshop
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Framework for HE Qualifications
Subject benchmark statements
Professional Body Requirements
Programme specification
Level of module
Pre- and co-requisites
Barred combinations
What are learning outcomes?
• An outcome is simply a result or
consequence of an action or process
• A learning outcome is what results from a
learning process
• Intended learning outcomes are
statements that predict what learners will
have gained as a result of learning
(Higher Education Academy)
Outcomes Model
Explicit
statement of
learning intent
Enabling
processes and
resources
Feedback loop
Assessment
criteria for
achievement
So for today…
Aims
This session aims to:
– Help you to reconsider your course design, and
whether you have ‘got the basics right’ in terms of
assessment
Intended learning outcomes (ILO)
By the end of this course you should be able to:
– Write explicit learning outcomes
– Design a course that is ‘constructively aligned’
Aims and learning outcomes
• Aims are written in terms of lecturer
intention
• Learning outcomes are written in terms of
student capability
What to consider in designing a
module: constructive alignment
1. Who are my students?
2. What are my aims/learning outcomes?
3. What outcomes do I hope students will
achieve?
4. What do I want to assess?
5. How do I want to assess my students?
6. What segments of content do I think are
essential building blocks for students
7. What teaching and learning strategies do I
want to use?
8. In what mode(s) will I deliver the course?
Alignment model
Figure 1. Aligning learning outcomes, learning and teaching activities and the
assessment. Adapted from Biggs(1999) p 27
Learning Outcomes
Learning outcomes
• Programme learning outcomes
• Module learning outcomes
• Session learning outcomes
Programme Learning
Outcomes
•Knowledge and understanding
•Intellectual skills
•Practical skills
•Key/transferable skills
Distillation matrix
Code
Year/Se
m
COMPULSORY MODULES
Title
K1
ECO127
K2
K3
I1
I2
I3
P1
P2
P3
T1
T2
T3
T4
1/1
Economics
Y
BMG106
1/1
MKT108
1/1
ACF110
1/2
BMG171
1/2
BMG170
1/2
BMGXXX
2/1
MKTXXX
2/1
Y
Y
Organisational Studies
Introduction to Marketing
Introduction to Accounting
Information Systems and Quantitative Analysis for
Managers
Introduction to Human Resource Management
Management of Organisations (Lloyd H)
Marketing Management (John Milliken)
Y
ACF321
2/2
BMGXXX
2/2
BMGXXX
3/1
ACFXXX
3/2
Managerial Accounting (Michael Thompson
Contemporary Issues in HRM (AMD)
Strategic Management (Lloyd Hunter)
Financial Management (Ken Dyson)
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Constructive alignment
Figure 1. Aligning learning outcomes, learning and teaching activities and the
assessment. Adapted from Biggs(1999) p 27
Module Level
SOLO taxonomy
• Pre structural
• Unistructural
• Multi structural
• Relational
• Extended abstract
Writing learning outcomes
• Aims
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Know
Understand
Determine
Appreciate
Grasp
Become familiar
• Outcomes
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Outline
Distinguish between
Choose
Assemble
Identify
Solve
Apply
Describe
Analyse
Synthesise
SOLO verbs
• Minimal understanding – sufficient to deal with
basic terminology – memorise, identify, recognise.
• Descriptive understanding – knowing about several
topics – classify, describe, list
• Integrative understanding – relating facts together and
understanding basis theory – apply to known contexts –
integrate,
‘If students are to learn desired
outcomes in a reasonably effective
manner, then the teacher’s
fundamental task is to get students to
engage in learning activities that
are likely to result in their achieving
those outcomes’ (Schuell, 1986)
Some examples
By the end of the module colleagues should be able to:
1. Plan and structure teaching sessions for
effective student learning
2. Apply appropriate teaching strategies and
technologies as appropriate
3. Present content in clear language and
stimulating ways
Writing learning outcomes
We recommend that you aim for between
four and eight learning outcomes for each of
your single modules, and up to twenty-five
outcomes for an entire programme.
Start programme outcomes with the
phrase:
‘A successful learner from this programme
will be able to …’
Start module outcomes with the phrase:
‘On successful completion of the module,
you will be able to …’
Writing learning outcomes
Examples
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Knowledge & understanding skills
Intellectual skills (Blooms)
Practical skills (subject specific)
Key/transferable (generic)
(Blooms)
Linking outcomes to
assessment
• Assessment tasks should fulfil module
outcomes
• One-to-one criterion for each outcome
• Multi criterion for each outcome
• Regular reference to module outcomes
Motivating students
Constructive planning
Learning outcomes
Learning
activities
Assessed
coursework
assignment
Final module
assessment task
WORKSHOP
Using the handout please
complete a learning
outcome from each
category for one of your
lectures/modules/courses.
•Knowledge & understanding skills
•Intellectual skills
•Practical skills
•Key/transferable
Learning
outcomes