The International Newcomers Academy

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Transcript The International Newcomers Academy

The International Newcomers Academy
PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTING AN
INTERNATIONAL NEWCOMERS ACADEMY
CMSD LEP ENROLLMENT
School Year
Average
Daily
Student
Enrollment
Black, nonHispanic
Asian or
Pacific
Islander
2009-2010
46,697
69.0%
0.6%
2010-2011
47,962
68.2%
2011-2012
42,772
68.2%
Hispanic
MultiRacial
White,
nonHispanic
Limited
English
Proficient
Students with
Disabilities
12.2%
3.1%
14.8%
5.5%
22.3%
0.6%
12.3%
2.2%
14.6%
6.0%
21.6%
0.7%
10.0%
2.6%
17.8%
6.2%
21.1%
Research Findings
Current research identified six major challenges for improving
the literacy of ELLs:
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Lack of common criteria for identifying ELLs and tracking their
academic performance
Lack of appropriate assessments
Inadequate educator capacity for improving literacy in ELLs
Lack of appropriate and flexible program options
Inadequate use of research-based instructional practices
Lack of a strong and coherent research agenda about
adolescent ELL literacy
Report to the Carnegie Corporation of New York: Double the Work- Challenges and Solutions to Acquiring Language and Academic Literacy for Adolescent English Language Learners, published by the Alliance for
Excellent Education in 2007, authored by Deborah J. Short and Shannon Fitzsimmons.
Possible Solutions
Newcomers students need specialized programs to accelerate their
learning of English, their acculturation to U.S. schooling practices,
and access basic content knowledge.
Research based recommended program features include:
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Intensive courses to integrate students and fill gaps in educational
background.
Sheltered instruction or bilingual education coupled with contentbased ESL classes
Length of enrollment based on individual needs
Staff selection process to ensure highly-qualified staff
Flexible pathways for graduation and careers
CMSD International Newcomers Academy Goals:
 Accelerate English language acquisition in
the four domains of listening, reading,
speaking and writing
 Develop academic content vocabulary and
higher level thinking skills
 Deliver high-quality academic core content
instruction
 Promote the development of crosscultural social and academic skills
students will need when entering district
mainstream schools
 Develop a strong interdisciplinary
foundation for long-term academic and
socio-cultural success
 Develops strong family and community
links that will foster cultural acclimation
and positive family school and community
engagement
Program Objectives:
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Students’ attainment of English as Second Language skills
based on State Standards within one to two school years
Achieve academic gains of a minimum of one grade level in
core academic content areas
Provide a flexible instructional curriculum that responds to
students’ bilingual language and cultural needs
Increase cultural exposure through varied activities
Students will develop learning strategies and self-awareness
for achieving success
Provide students a comprehensive support system in
collaborations with internal and external providers via
Humanware initiatives
Provide opportunities to effectively acclimate parents and
families to the community and to it’s available resources
CMSD- Newcomer Definition
and Entrance Criteria
A newcomer is a non English-speaking student who scores at the
beginning level on the English language placement test and has
been in the U.S. for no more than one school year.
INTERNATIONAL NEWCOMERS ACADEMY STUDENT
REPORT BY GRADES
GRADE
TOTAL
PRE-K
18
K
40
1
28
2
25
3
21
4
22
5
23
6
15
7
27
8
20
9
32
10
25
11
19
12
5
TOTALS
320
STUDENT DEMOGRAPHICS
GENDER
CITIZEN STATUS
ENROLLMENT
DATE
FEMALE
REFUGEE
ONE YEAR
46%
31%
90%
MALE
IMMIGRANT
TWO YEARS
56%
46%
10%
BORN IN PUERTO
RICO
42%
LANGUAGE
SPANISH= 58%
ARABIC=12%
NEPALESE=10%
20% Other Languages
Amharic
Burmese
Chinese
Dinka
French
Hindi
Japanese
Karen
Kirundi
Pul
Romanian
Russian
Swahili
Tagalog
Tigrinya
Vietnamese
STUDENT ENROLLMENT
STUDENT BY LAU CODES SY 2011-2012
STUDENT BY LAU CODES
9%
LAU A
91%
LAU B
This is what we do
Instructional Design
Use of ESL research
based practices and
principles primarily
utilizing sheltered
English instructional
methods and materials.
Use of Sheltered
English instructional
strategies and SIOP in
the teaching of core
content along with
native language
support.
In the Classroom
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5, 40 min. periods of ESL
daily
RIGOR English Reading
Program
SIOP Method used in all
content areas
Marzano’s Teaching Basic
and Advanced Vocabulary
Resources
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RIGOR
Spotlight On English
Imagine Learning
English in a Flash
Accelerated Reader
First in Math
Instructional Design
All students (Pre-K -12) follow an elementary program master schedule
based on forty minutes instructional periods.
Students are also grouped into one of two ESL levels (A and B) based on
their English proficiency levels and assigned to self-contained classes by
grade bands
ESL Level A:
Students at pre-functional level in English language acquisition and/or read
in English at the pre-literate level
Students receive 5 periods of ESL/ELA, 1 period of math, and 1 period of an
elective
ESL Level B:
Students with native language literacy skills and/or read in English at the
early literacy or above 3rd grade level
Students receive 4 periods of ESL/ELA, 1 period of math, 1 period of an
elective, 1 period of Sheltered English instruction integrating science and
social studies.
Instructional Design
Project based learning and Global studies are integrated school wide in
the academic subjects to build on students’ prior knowledge and
experiences
Students move through the proficiency levels at varying rates based on
classroom performance, motivation, ongoing assessments and teacher
observations.
A balanced literacy program is provided during the ESL/ELA
instructional block. Use of direct and indirect instruction, cooperative
flexible grouping, learning centers, rich language and student interaction
activities to supports vocabulary development
Use of technology lab and resources to support and practice reading,
speaking and listening skills.
CHALLENGES
VERTICAL DESIGN
2010-11
2011-12
Pre-K
Pre-K
K
K
1-2
K
3-4
1-2
5-6
2-3
7-8
3-4
9-12 English/ESL
4-5
9-12 Social Studies
5-6
9-12 Math
7-8
ESL Resource
10-12 Science
1/2 Music
10-12 English/ESL
1/2 P.E.
10-12 Science
1/2 Art
7-12 Social Studies
MEDIA
7-12 Math
MEDIA
1/2 Music
1/2 P.E.
1/2 Art
ESL Resource
9 English/ESL
CHALLENGES
NEW INCOMING STUDENTS DAILY
TESTING ACCOMMODATIONS
SPECIAL EDUCATION
GROWING PAINS
STAFFING:
CONTRACT ISSUES
INTERVIEWS
DISTRICT ECONOMIC SATUS=LAYOFFS
PROFESSIONALLY DEVELOPED STAFF
EXIT CRITERIA:
PARENT PUSH BACK
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Assessments
District and State standardized tests: OTELA, OAA,
OGT and CMSD Benchmark Tests
Resource Specific Assessments: English in a
Flash, STAR Reading, Accelerated Reader, First in
Math skills logs.
Authentic Assessments: Portfolios, Video for
reading fluency.
Video Recording
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Provides a way for evaluating reading fluency,
pronunciation and intonation
Reading Fluency Rubric used for evaluation.
Exit Criteria
The decision to exit a student from the Newcomer
program follows a standardized procedure
Teacher recommendations
Formal and informal observations
English-Language Development Observation Checklist,
Standardized test scores –OTELA & Benchmark tests
Student’s portfolio of class work
Parent Conference/Contract
Paths to Graduation for
Secondary Newcomer Academy Students
Newcomers Grades 6 - 8
Newcomers grades
9-12
/Bilingual Program
Schools Grades 6, 7, OR
8
Ninth Grade
Thomas Jefferson
Grade 9
Five year alternatives pathways for high school overage
students
OR
Other Schools of
Choice
Comprehensive High
Schools with support
Grades 10-12
OR
Other CMSD
High Schools
Provides , sheltered
instruction in content
subjects and bilingual
tutorial support with
academic credit leading to
HS diploma.
Provides counseling and
linkage to targeted postsecondary and career +
technical programs for
students unable to
graduate by age 21.
Referral to Career
+ Technical
training, credit
retrieval, GED for
17-21 year olds
with low credits
Support Intervention
Components
Student Transition Activities
Support to schools, collaboration with staff, students, parents and
administrators.
Discussion and end of year pre-preparation activities or
conferences by all staff with parents and students.
Students make visits to the receiving school and classrooms.
Students are transitioned into ESL/Bilingual classrooms at the
designated home school.
Orientation activities provided by the receiving school to ensure that
the newcomer students are provided appropriate information to
allow them to access appropriate courses and make decisions about
postsecondary options.
Support Intervention Resources
Parent Engagement
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Outreach and parent engagement activities will be implemented to
improve the whole family’s successful integration to the new
community and culture. (Workshops, socials, community trips etc.)
Collaborations with community partners will be established to
support and address the financial, educational and health needs of
families.
Health screening and referrals to therapeutic services for all
students who need additional care.
Support to break cultural barriers to help parents understand how
schools function and provide them with the information and
assistance they need to support their children’s education.
Support Intervention
Resources
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Multilingual Welcome Center services- (in the same
school location)
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Community Collaborations for student and family
services
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After school tutoring programs to support students'
academic achievement and increase interactions
with native English speakers
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Summer enrichment school offerings in
partnerships with community partners
Professional & Committed Staff
 Commitment to a school wide philosophy of research best
practices for English as a second language instruction and
academic outcomes for ELLs...
 Implement collaborative professional learning community
standards focused on improved student learning .
 Engage in common planning time (3 to 5 hours/week) to support
team collaborations, curriculum development and alignment of
curriculum based on student needs, and to monitor student
progress using data.
 Participate on ongoing job-embedded professional development
on a monthly basis along with opportunities to evaluate student
growth and progress effectiveness. ( 50 hours of summer preservice & after-school)
OHIO TEST OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE ACQUISITION (OTELA)
PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS BY PROFICIENCY LEVEL
GR. KDG LISTENING
30%
35%
1
2
3
35%
GR. KDG SPEAKING
15%
40%
1
2
3
45%
OHIO TEST OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE ACQUISITION (OTELA)
PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS BY PROFICIENCY LEVEL
GR. 1-2 LISTENING
GR. 1-2 SPEAKING
21%
32%
32%
37%
1
1
2
2
3
3
42%
37%
GR. 3-5 LISTENING
GR. 3-5 SPEAKING
7%
2%
20%
1
34%
24%
1
2
3
39%
4%
3
4
4
5
33%
2
5
26%
11%
OHIO TEST OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE ACQUISITION (OTELA)
PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS BY PROFICIENCY LEVEL
GR. 6-8 LISTENING
GR. 6-8 SPEAKING
6%
19%
35%
17%
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
23%
GR. 9-12 LISTENING
9%
GR. 9-12 SPEAKING
7%
17%
16%
1
28%
1
2
29%
2
3
16%
4
4
5
5
17%
39%
3
22%
•SCHOOL YEAR [email protected] JEFFERSON
SCHOOL YEAR 2011-12
[email protected] JEFFERSON
•SY 2009-2010 JOSEPH M. GALLAGHER
SCHOOL YEAR [email protected] JEFFERSON
•SY 2010-2011 JOSEPH M. GALLAGHER
•SCHOOL YEAR 2009-10 LINCOLN COMMUNITY WRAPARROUND
•SCHOOL YEAR 2010-11 LINCOLN COMMUNITY WRAPAROUND
•SCHOOL YEAR 2009-10-LINCOLN PROGRAMMING AND SOFTWARE
•SCHOOL YEAR 2010-11-LINCOLN PROGRAMMING AND SOFTWARE
•SCHOOL YEAR 2009-10-LINCOLN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
•SCHOOL YEAR 2010-11-LINCOLN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
Accelerated Reader Data
Accelerated Reader Data
Questions?
Contact Information
Natividad Pagan: Director, Multilingual Multicultural Education
[email protected] (216) 574-8584
Rhonda A. Corr Saegert: Principal, International Newcomers
Academy [email protected] (216) 404-5111
Margaret Berrios-Brown:Academic Coach
[email protected]  (216) 224-1547
The International Newcomers Academy
3145 West 46th Street, Cleveland, OH 44102
(216) 404-5098