FAINTING Children are particularly susceptible to fainting. Fainting, is due to a temporary lack of blood supply to the brain. Recovery is generally.

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Transcript FAINTING Children are particularly susceptible to fainting. Fainting, is due to a temporary lack of blood supply to the brain. Recovery is generally.

Slide 1

FAINTING
Children are particularly susceptible to fainting.
Fainting, is due to a temporary lack of blood supply to the brain.
Recovery is generally quick and no harm will come to your casualty with some
very simple prompt treatment
RECOGNITION

TREATMENT











They may feel nauseous, dizzy and weak
They will have a pale complexion, possibly
sweating
Their pulse will be slower than normal
They may go into unconsciousness briefly.






Help the child to the floor if possible
Lay them on their back
Raise the legs to a position above the
heart and support
If it is warm, allow fresh air in and cool
them down
Check the airway and ensure
they are still breathing normally
Loosen any tight clothing
Keep talking to them and
reassure them throughout.

FEBRILE SEIZURE/CONVULSION
Some young children experience a ‘Febrile Seizure’ which is brought on by a high
temperature or infection. A febrile convulsion can be very frightening for the parents
or carer’s of the child. During the seizure the child may appear to stop breathing and
the lips may go blue. If the parents are present then calm reassurance will be
necessary. Febrile convulsions most commonly affect children between the ages of
one and four (they affect about 1 in 20) but can affect children anywhere between 6
months and six years old.

The child may have been unwell over the past day or so and will be hot to the touch.
RECOGNITION
● Flushed and sweating
● The body may stiffen and their back may arch
● Fists may be clenched
● They may hold their breath and appear blue in colour.
TREATMENT
● Protect the child from injury, paying particular attention to the head
● Cool them down by removing outer/restrictive clothing and ensuring a fresh supply of cool air
● When the seizures stop, place them in the recovery position and monitor signs of life
● If they become unconscious, you must call
for an ambulance.

EPILEPSY / SEIZURES
There are many things that can cause a seizure, such as epilepsy, a lack of oxygen to the brain, a
head injury, or even the body temperature becoming too high.
If he seizure is caused by a high temperature (which is common with young children), this is
called a “febrile convulsion”.

The majority of seizures follow a pattern of phases:
Tonic

Every muscle in the body becomes rigid. The child may let out a cry and
will fall to the floor. The back may arch and the lips may go blue. This
phase typically lasts less than 30 seconds.

Clonic

The limbs of the body make sudden, violent jerking movements, the eyes
may roll, the teeth may clench, saliva may drool from the mouth
(sometimes blood-stained as a result of biting the tongue) and breathing
could be loud like “snoring”. The child may lose control of the bladder or
bowel. This phase typically lasts less than 2 minutes.

Recovery

The seizure stops and the child may go into a deep sleep or become very
confused or agitated. The child should come around within a few minutes.

Treatment of Seizure / Fitting / Convulsions
During the seizure:

After the seizure:













Move dangerous objects away from
the child.
Gently protect the head with a folded
coat or your hands.
Time the seizure – make a note of the
exact time and duration.
Loosen any tight clothing around the
neck to help breathing.
Call 999/112 for emergency help if
the seizure lasts longer than 3
minutes, they have a second seizure,
they have injured themselves, this is
the child’s first ever seizure or the
seizure lasts more than 2 minutes
longer than is “normal” for the child.





Check Airway and Breathing.
Place the child in the recovery position.
Move bystanders away before they wake, to
protect modesty.
Call 999/112 for emergency help if you cant
wake them up within 10 minutes.
Constantly monitor Airway and Breathing.

NEVER place anything in the child’s mouth.
NEVER try to restrain the child.
NEVER move the child unnecessarily.


Slide 2

FAINTING
Children are particularly susceptible to fainting.
Fainting, is due to a temporary lack of blood supply to the brain.
Recovery is generally quick and no harm will come to your casualty with some
very simple prompt treatment
RECOGNITION

TREATMENT











They may feel nauseous, dizzy and weak
They will have a pale complexion, possibly
sweating
Their pulse will be slower than normal
They may go into unconsciousness briefly.






Help the child to the floor if possible
Lay them on their back
Raise the legs to a position above the
heart and support
If it is warm, allow fresh air in and cool
them down
Check the airway and ensure
they are still breathing normally
Loosen any tight clothing
Keep talking to them and
reassure them throughout.

FEBRILE SEIZURE/CONVULSION
Some young children experience a ‘Febrile Seizure’ which is brought on by a high
temperature or infection. A febrile convulsion can be very frightening for the parents
or carer’s of the child. During the seizure the child may appear to stop breathing and
the lips may go blue. If the parents are present then calm reassurance will be
necessary. Febrile convulsions most commonly affect children between the ages of
one and four (they affect about 1 in 20) but can affect children anywhere between 6
months and six years old.

The child may have been unwell over the past day or so and will be hot to the touch.
RECOGNITION
● Flushed and sweating
● The body may stiffen and their back may arch
● Fists may be clenched
● They may hold their breath and appear blue in colour.
TREATMENT
● Protect the child from injury, paying particular attention to the head
● Cool them down by removing outer/restrictive clothing and ensuring a fresh supply of cool air
● When the seizures stop, place them in the recovery position and monitor signs of life
● If they become unconscious, you must call
for an ambulance.

EPILEPSY / SEIZURES
There are many things that can cause a seizure, such as epilepsy, a lack of oxygen to the brain, a
head injury, or even the body temperature becoming too high.
If he seizure is caused by a high temperature (which is common with young children), this is
called a “febrile convulsion”.

The majority of seizures follow a pattern of phases:
Tonic

Every muscle in the body becomes rigid. The child may let out a cry and
will fall to the floor. The back may arch and the lips may go blue. This
phase typically lasts less than 30 seconds.

Clonic

The limbs of the body make sudden, violent jerking movements, the eyes
may roll, the teeth may clench, saliva may drool from the mouth
(sometimes blood-stained as a result of biting the tongue) and breathing
could be loud like “snoring”. The child may lose control of the bladder or
bowel. This phase typically lasts less than 2 minutes.

Recovery

The seizure stops and the child may go into a deep sleep or become very
confused or agitated. The child should come around within a few minutes.

Treatment of Seizure / Fitting / Convulsions
During the seizure:

After the seizure:













Move dangerous objects away from
the child.
Gently protect the head with a folded
coat or your hands.
Time the seizure – make a note of the
exact time and duration.
Loosen any tight clothing around the
neck to help breathing.
Call 999/112 for emergency help if
the seizure lasts longer than 3
minutes, they have a second seizure,
they have injured themselves, this is
the child’s first ever seizure or the
seizure lasts more than 2 minutes
longer than is “normal” for the child.





Check Airway and Breathing.
Place the child in the recovery position.
Move bystanders away before they wake, to
protect modesty.
Call 999/112 for emergency help if you cant
wake them up within 10 minutes.
Constantly monitor Airway and Breathing.

NEVER place anything in the child’s mouth.
NEVER try to restrain the child.
NEVER move the child unnecessarily.


Slide 3

FAINTING
Children are particularly susceptible to fainting.
Fainting, is due to a temporary lack of blood supply to the brain.
Recovery is generally quick and no harm will come to your casualty with some
very simple prompt treatment
RECOGNITION

TREATMENT











They may feel nauseous, dizzy and weak
They will have a pale complexion, possibly
sweating
Their pulse will be slower than normal
They may go into unconsciousness briefly.






Help the child to the floor if possible
Lay them on their back
Raise the legs to a position above the
heart and support
If it is warm, allow fresh air in and cool
them down
Check the airway and ensure
they are still breathing normally
Loosen any tight clothing
Keep talking to them and
reassure them throughout.

FEBRILE SEIZURE/CONVULSION
Some young children experience a ‘Febrile Seizure’ which is brought on by a high
temperature or infection. A febrile convulsion can be very frightening for the parents
or carer’s of the child. During the seizure the child may appear to stop breathing and
the lips may go blue. If the parents are present then calm reassurance will be
necessary. Febrile convulsions most commonly affect children between the ages of
one and four (they affect about 1 in 20) but can affect children anywhere between 6
months and six years old.

The child may have been unwell over the past day or so and will be hot to the touch.
RECOGNITION
● Flushed and sweating
● The body may stiffen and their back may arch
● Fists may be clenched
● They may hold their breath and appear blue in colour.
TREATMENT
● Protect the child from injury, paying particular attention to the head
● Cool them down by removing outer/restrictive clothing and ensuring a fresh supply of cool air
● When the seizures stop, place them in the recovery position and monitor signs of life
● If they become unconscious, you must call
for an ambulance.

EPILEPSY / SEIZURES
There are many things that can cause a seizure, such as epilepsy, a lack of oxygen to the brain, a
head injury, or even the body temperature becoming too high.
If he seizure is caused by a high temperature (which is common with young children), this is
called a “febrile convulsion”.

The majority of seizures follow a pattern of phases:
Tonic

Every muscle in the body becomes rigid. The child may let out a cry and
will fall to the floor. The back may arch and the lips may go blue. This
phase typically lasts less than 30 seconds.

Clonic

The limbs of the body make sudden, violent jerking movements, the eyes
may roll, the teeth may clench, saliva may drool from the mouth
(sometimes blood-stained as a result of biting the tongue) and breathing
could be loud like “snoring”. The child may lose control of the bladder or
bowel. This phase typically lasts less than 2 minutes.

Recovery

The seizure stops and the child may go into a deep sleep or become very
confused or agitated. The child should come around within a few minutes.

Treatment of Seizure / Fitting / Convulsions
During the seizure:

After the seizure:













Move dangerous objects away from
the child.
Gently protect the head with a folded
coat or your hands.
Time the seizure – make a note of the
exact time and duration.
Loosen any tight clothing around the
neck to help breathing.
Call 999/112 for emergency help if
the seizure lasts longer than 3
minutes, they have a second seizure,
they have injured themselves, this is
the child’s first ever seizure or the
seizure lasts more than 2 minutes
longer than is “normal” for the child.





Check Airway and Breathing.
Place the child in the recovery position.
Move bystanders away before they wake, to
protect modesty.
Call 999/112 for emergency help if you cant
wake them up within 10 minutes.
Constantly monitor Airway and Breathing.

NEVER place anything in the child’s mouth.
NEVER try to restrain the child.
NEVER move the child unnecessarily.


Slide 4

FAINTING
Children are particularly susceptible to fainting.
Fainting, is due to a temporary lack of blood supply to the brain.
Recovery is generally quick and no harm will come to your casualty with some
very simple prompt treatment
RECOGNITION

TREATMENT











They may feel nauseous, dizzy and weak
They will have a pale complexion, possibly
sweating
Their pulse will be slower than normal
They may go into unconsciousness briefly.






Help the child to the floor if possible
Lay them on their back
Raise the legs to a position above the
heart and support
If it is warm, allow fresh air in and cool
them down
Check the airway and ensure
they are still breathing normally
Loosen any tight clothing
Keep talking to them and
reassure them throughout.

FEBRILE SEIZURE/CONVULSION
Some young children experience a ‘Febrile Seizure’ which is brought on by a high
temperature or infection. A febrile convulsion can be very frightening for the parents
or carer’s of the child. During the seizure the child may appear to stop breathing and
the lips may go blue. If the parents are present then calm reassurance will be
necessary. Febrile convulsions most commonly affect children between the ages of
one and four (they affect about 1 in 20) but can affect children anywhere between 6
months and six years old.

The child may have been unwell over the past day or so and will be hot to the touch.
RECOGNITION
● Flushed and sweating
● The body may stiffen and their back may arch
● Fists may be clenched
● They may hold their breath and appear blue in colour.
TREATMENT
● Protect the child from injury, paying particular attention to the head
● Cool them down by removing outer/restrictive clothing and ensuring a fresh supply of cool air
● When the seizures stop, place them in the recovery position and monitor signs of life
● If they become unconscious, you must call
for an ambulance.

EPILEPSY / SEIZURES
There are many things that can cause a seizure, such as epilepsy, a lack of oxygen to the brain, a
head injury, or even the body temperature becoming too high.
If he seizure is caused by a high temperature (which is common with young children), this is
called a “febrile convulsion”.

The majority of seizures follow a pattern of phases:
Tonic

Every muscle in the body becomes rigid. The child may let out a cry and
will fall to the floor. The back may arch and the lips may go blue. This
phase typically lasts less than 30 seconds.

Clonic

The limbs of the body make sudden, violent jerking movements, the eyes
may roll, the teeth may clench, saliva may drool from the mouth
(sometimes blood-stained as a result of biting the tongue) and breathing
could be loud like “snoring”. The child may lose control of the bladder or
bowel. This phase typically lasts less than 2 minutes.

Recovery

The seizure stops and the child may go into a deep sleep or become very
confused or agitated. The child should come around within a few minutes.

Treatment of Seizure / Fitting / Convulsions
During the seizure:

After the seizure:













Move dangerous objects away from
the child.
Gently protect the head with a folded
coat or your hands.
Time the seizure – make a note of the
exact time and duration.
Loosen any tight clothing around the
neck to help breathing.
Call 999/112 for emergency help if
the seizure lasts longer than 3
minutes, they have a second seizure,
they have injured themselves, this is
the child’s first ever seizure or the
seizure lasts more than 2 minutes
longer than is “normal” for the child.





Check Airway and Breathing.
Place the child in the recovery position.
Move bystanders away before they wake, to
protect modesty.
Call 999/112 for emergency help if you cant
wake them up within 10 minutes.
Constantly monitor Airway and Breathing.

NEVER place anything in the child’s mouth.
NEVER try to restrain the child.
NEVER move the child unnecessarily.