Low Carbon Network Fund Conference slides 12 – 14 November 2013 Transition from IFI & LCNF to NIA Darren Jones 12 November 2013 Timeline • Key •Innovation Individual PhraseFunding Project – Innovation •

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Transcript Low Carbon Network Fund Conference slides 12 – 14 November 2013 Transition from IFI & LCNF to NIA Darren Jones 12 November 2013 Timeline • Key •Innovation Individual PhraseFunding Project – Innovation •

Low Carbon Network Fund
Conference slides
12 – 14 November 2013
1
Transition from IFI & LCNF to NIA
Darren Jones
12 November 2013
2
Timeline
• Key
•Innovation
Individual
PhraseFunding
Project
– Innovation
• • GPG
Stimuli
MoreG85
defined
arewritten
aimed
at
Incentive
registration
delivering a(not
cultural change
by
eligibility
ENA
where
R&D
criteria
DNOs
approval)
thewith
ethos,
structures
to offerand
• establish
Prior
to 2005
low internal
• Group
More
third
Ofgem
party
contacts that facilitate
basic
guidance
innovation
level
of industry
dissemination
as
part innovation
of business as •usual
driven
Light
required
touch
– LCNF
reporting
conference/formal
requirements
close-down
reports
LCNF T1
NIA
IFI
2005
2010
2015
2023
3
Key changes
Oversight
IFI closes in
2015
Project
Parameters
‘De-minimis’
DNO
Innovation
Strategy
4
ENA knowledge dissemination portal
5
Number Fuse
Operations –
2005 Figures
Number of Circuits Affected
(out of 120,000)
1
2
3
4
5
1,665
635
329
204
131
Number of Circuits Affected
Examples – smart fuse project
1800
1600
1400
1200
1000
800
600
400
200
0
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
Number of Fuse Operations
6
Examples - smart fuse PEA
Information required
Description
Project title
Smart fuse
Funding licensee(s)
ENWL
Problem(s)
Transient fault management
Method(s)
Develop a new ‘widget’ & implement as business as usual
Scope & objectives
New product development | Test | Implement & measure results
Success criteria
Reduction of CIS and CMLs
Project partners & external funding
Kelvatek
Potential for new learning
Network monitoring
Scale of project
Build prototype | Productionise | Implement & measure results
Geographical area
ENWL licensee area
Payments to related undertakings
None
7
Examples - smart fuse ££££
Information required
Revenue allowed for in the
RIIO settlement
Indicative total
NIA project expenditure
Description
Cost of cable overlays
£600k over four years
│ 80% of faults are transient
Base case cost
│ £500 for an LV fault
│ ~ 5000 fuse operations in 2005 x £500 ~ £2.5m
│ Project cost £600k
Method cost
│ To cover 50% of circuits at any one time requires
600 smart fuses - £300k
│ £200k set up costs (policies and training)
Financial benefit of the project
│ Could eliminate 3700 fuse operations x £500 =
£1.8M pa - 10 yr. Lifetime for device
│ £18M - £1.1m = £16.9M project financial benefit
8
Examples – oil regeneration project
9
Examples - oil regeneration PEA
Information required
Description
Project title
Oil Regeneration
Funding licensee(s)
ENWL
Problem(s)
Transient fault management
Method(s)
Develop a new process and implement as business as usual
Scope & objectives
New product development | Test | Implement & measure results
Success criteria
Life extension
Project partners & external funding
University of Manchester
Potential for new learning
Asset Management
Scale of project
| Define benefits and trial | Implement and measure results
Geographical area
ENWL licensee area
Payments to related undertakings
None
10
Examples - oil regeneration - £££
Information required
Revenue allowed for in the
RIIO settlement
Indicative total
NIA project expenditure
Base case cost
Description
Cost of transformer replacement
£250k over two years
│ £500k for primary transformer
replacement
│ £2M for grid transformer replacement
Method cost
Financial benefit of the project
£50k for oil regeneration process
per transformer
Deferment of the replacement of 70 grid
& primary transformers
11
Conclusion
Measurable
financial value
to customers
NIA rules not
unreasonable
Innovation
Strategy is key
Project must
‘tell a story’
How will it be
Implemented
in a DNO
business
12
CLASS
Customer Load Active System Services
Victoria Turnham
13 November 2013
13
Customer Load Active System Services
Maximise
use of
existing
assets
Offer new
services and
choice for
the future
Delivering
value to
customers
Generate
value for
customers
now
Customer Load Active System Services - Expert Panel Presentation
Innovative
solutions
to real
problems
Proven
technology
deployable
today
CLASS
14
Back to school for a moment . . .
This fundamental relationship is
at the heart of CLASS
But how will it change over
time as customers adopt
new devices?
How could we use this
relationship in a smart way to
benefit customers?
Customer Load Active System Services - Expert Panel Presentation
15
How does it work
00:03:00
2%
00:00:08
2%
The cost £ to make your cup of tea is always the same!
“A problem shared
is a problem halved
. . .”
20,000 homes in
a town
200,000 homes
in a city
26 million
across the UK
What problems could we solve ?
16
CLASS proposes to harness thousands
of tiny changes at just the right time
2% decrease in demand
at peak times
Lower network costs
Faster connections
Today
High peak demand
2% decrease in demand
2% increase in demand
Lower balancing costs
Reduced carbon
Lower energy costs
Tomorrow
Response and reserve
Future
Wind following
17
The CLASS trials
Objective
Technique
Load modelling
Establish voltage/demand
relationship
Raise & lower tap position
Demand response
Demand response for peak
reduction
Lower tap position
Primary response to reduce demand
when frequency falls on the
transmission network
Switch out transformer
Secondary response to reduce
demand after primary response
above
Lower tap position
Absorb high voltages that occur on
the transmission network
Stagger tap position
Frequency
response
Reactive power
18
CLASS system overview
Autonomous
substation controller
60 primary
substations
SCADA
Electricity transmission
operator
Project
control
PowerOn Fusion™
Dashboard
XA21™
PowerOn Fusion™
Dashboard
ICCP
19
The technology
Smart voltage control relay in major substations linked to control
centre
Allows voltage to be adjusted to drive demand changes.
Automatically stabilises network frequency.
Keeps voltages at safe levels on transmission and distribution
networks with high amount of DG
Advanced Network Management System
Links DNO control centre to National Grid control centre.
Advanced dashboard measures real time availability.
Allows demand and voltage control call off when required
Harnessing world class technology in a innovative solution
20
CLASS system overview
Autonomous
substation controller
60 primary
substations
Scada
Electricity transmission
operator
Project
control
PowerOn Fusion™
Dashboard
XA21™
PowerOn Fusion™
Dashboard
ICCP
21
CLASS system overview
Autonomous
substation controller
60 primary
substations
Scada
Electricity transmission
operator
Project
control
PowerOn Fusion™
Dashboard
XA21™
PowerOn Fusion™
Dashboard
ICCP
22
The CLASS dashboard
Group
T11
Tap/Current
T12
Tap/Current
South
manch
Trafford
11.1kV
T11
6/400A
T12
6/400A
Monton
11kV
T11
6/400A
T12
6/400A
Mount st
10.9kV
T11
6/400A
T12
6/400A
Frequency control
MW
Demand %
Voltage Control Mvars
Boost
Reduction
Stage 1
Stage 2
Stage 1
Stage 2
Stage 3
Half
Full
Half
Full
6
4
0.4
0.8
1.2
2
4
2
4
Enabled
Activated
Enabled
Enabled
Activated
Enabled
Enabled
3
2
0.2
0.4
0.6
1
2
Enabled
Activated
Enabled
Enabled
Activated
Enabled
Enabled
3
2
0.2
0.4
0.6
1
2
Enabled
Activated
Enabled
Enabled
Activated
Enabled
Enabled
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Inhibited
Inhibited
Inhibited
Inhibited
Inhibited
Disabled
1
2
Disabled
1
2
Disabled
0
0
Inhibited
Inhibited
23
CLASS system overview
Autonomous
substation controller
60 primary
substations
Scada
Electricity transmission
operator
Project
control
PowerOn Fusion™
Dashboard
XA21™
PowerOn Fusion™
Dashboard
ICCP
24
ICCP (Inter Control Centre Protocol)
DNO control centre
National Grid control centre
Dashboard
Control call
Measures real
time availability
Demand and voltage
control call off
25
CLASS: Customer Load Active
System Services
Exploiting
assets, innovative
thinking and tiny
changes at just
the right time
Technical
innovation
Reinforcement
deferral,
response
balancing and
voltage control
World class
technology
Carbon savings
and lower
customer bills
Financial and
carbon savings
for customers
VV&&DD data
data
underpins
underpins
network
network
management
management
now and
and into
now
into
thefuture
future
the
New
understanding
of a fundamental
relationship
CLASS will deliver savings to DNO customers and across the supply chain
26
The Smart Fuse
Darren Jones
13 November 2013
27
IFI Project - 2006 to 2010
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
28
ENWT1001 the bidoyng smart fuse
Load data
gathering
Improve
customer
service
Development
of policies
and
procedures
29
Load data analysis
Way
Number Loads
Total Generation (kWp)
Generation per load
(kWp/house)
1
29
22.0
0.76
2
32
16.0
0.47
99.8
1.49
Modelled
in OpenDSS
3
67
4by PhD students
73
Total
201
88.9
1.22
Using
the DEI smart
226.7
grid
lab to recreate1.12
the
load/export profiles
30
Load data analysis
31
Load data analysis
Parameters measured
included
Conclusions (at these
locations)
Mean
Minimum
Without
effects of PV
Maximum
The
voltage remains
within a
Bus-neutral
voltage
tight band at the LV transformer
and is governed by the voltage
Feeder
current
on
the 11kV
network
With effects
Mean of PV
TheApparent
PV influences power
power factor
causing it to reduce due to the real
Power factor
power component of the PV output
Reactive
power
and there
is no noticeable
effect of
PV on LV transformer voltage
Real power
32
Improving customer service
% Breakdown of LV CI’s & CML’s (Data: 2007)
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
U/G Mains
U/G Services
O/H Mains
O/H Services
33
Improving customer service
Frequency
1800
1600
1400
1200
1000
800
600
400
200
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
No of Operations
34
Improving customer service
[ 1st Trip ]
Replace
Fuse
Obtain a Fault
Location
2nd
[
Trip ]
Fit ReZap(s) /
Bidoyngs
Warn off
Customers
Verify
Location
–
Sniffer / TP22
Repair Fault
Time
35
Improving customer service
36
Supply restoration
Example Fault - Newlyn Ave, Macclesfield
37
Supply restoration
Example Fault - Newlyn Ave, Macclesfield
2 x modular rezaps + 1 x bidoyng
Fault location 86m +/- 15m
Only 3 trips to achieve fault location
Fault location actually at 71m
Verified using fault sniffer
Backfed & cut either side of faulty joint
38
Supply restoration
Example Fault - Newlyn Ave, Macclesfield
39
Conclusions
Project
completed
Initial idea
to BAU
Confidence
in
technology
Vision of
main
business
Key to
success
Long term
investment
Relationship
with Vendor
Long term
benefits for
industry
40
LV Networks of the Future
Geraldine Bryson –
Future Networks Technical Manager
LNCF Conference
13 November 2013
41
What are the issues?
PV – 129 943
HP – 86 948
EV – 252 200
Products
already
discussed
help today’s
network issues
What about
networks of
the future?
Uptake of
LCTs DECC
Scenario 4
by 2030
Coping with
increase in
demand and
generation?
42
One solution
eta
Tier 1
Voltage
Network
2013 TierMonitoring
2
Configuration
Proposal Data
Real Time
Control
Optimisation
Software
Active
Network
Management
43
What will it look like?
Primary
Transformer Automatic
Voltage
Controller
(AVC)
Key:
LV Network Management
LV/HV Voltage Control
Network Management System and
Interface
Network Configuration and Voltage
Optimisation
LV
Capacitor
Optimisation
Software
ICCP
Link
ENWL
NMS
HV
Capacitor
LV Meshing
Point
Distribution
Transformer
AVC
LV Circuit
Breakers
HV Meshing
Point
44
Voltage control
Distribution
transformers
- OLTC
Capacitors
Increase
capacity
Improve
voltage to
customer
260
258
256
254
L1
252
L2
250
L3
248
246
244
45
Existing radial network
Network limitations
Diversity between feeders is
untapped
Fuses unable to cope with cold
load pick up
Customer impact
Customers’ needs invisible to the
network
Demand and generation levels limited by
passive voltage control systems
Reliability driven by fix on fail
46
Future meshed networks
Software
C
C2C
C
C
W
C2C
CLASS
L
W
C
W
C
C
C2C
L
C
Key
C2C
C
Capacity to Customers
W
LV circuit
Capacitor
L
Link box
Voltage stabilised across the load range  Power flows optimised
47
Network configuration
Meshing
networks
unlocks
capacity
Why hasn’t it
been done
before?
What’s
different
now?
Development
of new
technology
for LV
network
IT HAS….
Fuse
Technologies
48
New LV devices
WEEZAP
Retrofit
device
Vacuum
circuit
breaker
Network
management Communications
Greater
control for
LV Network
Enhanced
protection for
initial fault
response
49
Conclusions
Fault management –
great for today’s network
Better ways to manage
What about the future?
LV networks
Real time network configuration
Real time voltage control
New products
New application
50
Update on LV network monitoring
and learning outcomes
Breakout session 2 Network monitoring solutions
Dan Randles
LCNF Conference
13 November 2013
51
Aims and objectives
To aid business
planning
To improve
understanding
Text
Remove
potential barriers
To trial
solutions to
manage voltages
52
Check list…
Determine monitoring requirements
Prepare functional specifications
Tender and procure equipment
Approve installation and commissioning procedures
Train installation crews
Roll out to site
Prepare for data capture (architecture and protocols)
Extract, cleanse and transfer network and customer data
Develop models and validate results
Investigate variances
Leverage early learning to support business planning
53
Check list…
Drive value for our customers
54
The role of network monitoring
Challenge
Solutions
New technology
55
5 July
21 July 2013
28 July 2013
Voltage
Real power
Harmonics
Sun intensity
Some results…
56
What are the issues?
Challenge
Loads
Moving data Allocation
from GIS into
of
power flow individual
engine
customer
5
x 10
Result
storage
Allocation Time series
of sites and simulation
sizes
3 phase
four wire
power flow
5
Substation 3
4.018
Impact
assessment
Voltage
problems
Substation 16
x 10
3.9835
3.983
4.0175
3.9825
4.017
3.982
Utilisation
level
3.9815
[m]
4.0165
[m]
Power
flow
PV
4.016
loads
3.981
3.9805
4.0155
3.98
4.015
3.9795
4.0145
3.979
3.9785
4.014
3.569
3.57
3.571
3.572
[m]
3.573
3.574
3.863
5
x 10
3.864
3.865
3.866
[m]
3.867
3.868
3.869
5
x 10
Energy
losses
57
Some interesting findings
58
Meshing LV networks – results
Subte1 - Feeder4
Subte1 - Feeder4
80
220
Radial Operation
Meshed Operation
Radial Operation
Meshed Operation
200
60
180
50
160
3.5
[%]
Customers [%]
70
40
Winter Load
EHP
Summer Load
PV
140
3
120
30
2.5
100
20
80
kW
2
10
0
60
1.5
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
PV Penetration [%]
100
40
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
EHP Penetration [%]
1
0.5
% of customers with
voltage problems
Utilisation level of the first
24 hours - 30 min resolution
feeder
segment
0
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
Inputs: Profiles
Network
Impact assessment
tool for+the
case without and
with meshed connection
59
Next steps
Investigate use of
advanced voltage
control on LV
networks (LoVIA)
Bidoyng smart fuse
- project close down
report to be
published
December 2013
Voltage
management at LV
busbars - project
close down report
to be published
January 2014
Additional
dissemination
planned
Continue work to
refine LV network
models, evaluate
and analyse
monitoring data
Develop
representative LV
networks and
solutions
Consider benefits
case for ongoing
cost-effective
deployment
60
Conclusion
Even relatively
small trials are
generating large
amounts of data
Key to facilitating
better
understanding
Low cost initial
intervention if
problems are
unclear
Low cost retrofit
devices now
available in the
market
Management of this
data represents a
new challenge
Potential to release
capacity quickly via
innovative low cost
solutions
We can now
explore options via
accurate, validated
simulations
61
Questions and useful links
[email protected]
www.enwl.co.uk/thefuture
0800 195 4141
@ElectricityNW
linkedin.com/company/electricity-north-west
facebook.com/ElectricityNorthWest
youtube.com/ElectricityNorthWest
[email protected]
62
ENW Customer Engagement
Mark Crane
Future Networks Commercial Manager
14 November 2013
63
Innovatively releasing Capacity to Customers
Capacity
to customers
Technical
innovation
Utilised
capacity
Current
demand
New commercial
contracts
Latent
capacity
| Combining proven technology
& new commercial contracts
| Allows us to release significant
network capacity back to
customers
| Facilitating connection of new
demand & generation without
reinforcement
| Apply remote control equipment
to the HV circuit and close the
normal open point
| Enhance network management
software
| This effectively doubles the
available capacity of the circuit
negating the need for traditional
reinforcement
| To retain customers’ security of
supply we will utilise innovative
demand side response contracts
| These contracts will allow us
to control the consumption of
customers on a circuit at the
time of fault
64
The C2C concept
Primary Substation
New
customers
Existing
customers
Reduced charge
for connecting to
the network
A variable revenue
stream dependent
upon level of
flexibility
For both new and existing customers an opportunity to
participate in an innovative trial that will generate learning
for the future operation of distribution networks
65
Understanding the Customer
Existing Customers
66
Understanding the customer
Quantitative
Qualitative
Surveyed 200 customers for an n-1 DSR contract
Small number directly engaged initially via workshops
67
Understanding the customer
Uncertainty
regarding disruption
or multiple
disruptions
Appeal
Effects
of value added
offerings
on the
customer’s business
Flexible
Maximum
protected days and
option for protected
circuits
outages per annum
and duration to be
defined
Open & Honest Way
Understand
price level
Maximum of 2 Events P.A.
68
Price model development
Rekon Report – 25th May 2012
Aggregator
1
Other
DSM
Aggregator
4
Different views on the value of n-1DSR
Qualitative
£20k/MVA
p.a.IISmid-point
target (availability
Original
Aggregator
Aggregator payment)
Bid
MVA p.a. £10k
2
£15k
3
£20-30k
Customer
Research
£40k
£90k
69
Commercial contract terms
Presentations
Initial fears can
were
to the
becrucial
quickly
customer’s
overcome with
understanding
‘comfort’ factors
Flexible options
became less
important
Customer
interface
developed to
allow freedom to
choose and
explore
price / flexibility
Face to face
meetings are
important
70
Stuart Murray
Group Company Accountant
71
Initial
engagement
Response
and initial
barriers to
signing
Reasons for
signing
Further low
carbon
initiative
considerations
72
Contract Development
Existing Customers
73
Contract template development
Demandand generation
Generation
Demand
NTC
Existing
customers
DCUSA
Contract
Contract
Contract
Options:
• Outage duration (from 2 – 8 hours)
• Protected days
• Protected load
• Outage times, days and seasons options
Managed
connection
agreement
Customers requested the contract be as simple as possible
Project deliverable to sign a minimum of 10 ‘existing customers’
74
Progress to Date
Existing Customers
75
Customer spread-load size v price v sector
£k/MVA
£k/MWp.a.
p.a.
35
341kVA
30
25
130kVA
185kVA
630kVA
800kVA
600kVA
487kVA
Utilities
Leisure
Manufacturing
Retail
20
20
15
800kVA
10
1800kVA
5200kVA
5
0
10 customers signed up, totalling 11.6MVA at an average price of
£22,570/MVA p.a. varying different market sectors and size from
130kVA to 5200kVA
76
DSR observations
Partners
Larger catchment
area, lower price
High Voltage
feeder balancing
reliant on SMEs
(mainly
manufacturing)
Grid & Primary
balancing –
access larger
strategic partners
and
manufacturers
77
Routes to Market
Existing Customers
78
Routes to market
On-cost
Overhead
30%
8%
Aggregator/Agent
DNO Direct
79
Conclusion
Existing Customers
80
Conclusion
n-1 DSR
n-1 DSR is
highly viable
and competitively
priced under
this model
Opportunity for
Aggregators to
reduce their
margin or DNOs
to increase
capability
DNO direct
customer
engagement is
attractive
because:
Lower overhead
ENW decision to
discount G&P
reinforcement in
RIIO ED1 by
20% through the
use of DSR/M
contracts
Ongoing customer
relationship
management
81