New Jersey Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (NJ ASK)

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Transcript New Jersey Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (NJ ASK)

W.E. Houston Academy
Kim Callender, Literacy Coordinator
Kim Racine, Math Coach, Test Coordinator
Henry Hamilton, Principal
Heather Jones, Assistant Principal
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To measure and promote student
achievement of challenging state curriculum
standards
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To provide accurate and meaningful
information about student performance
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To meet state and federal accountability
requirements
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April 23 - 26 NJASK 7-8
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April 30 - May 3 NJASK 5 & 6
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May 7 – 11 NJASK 3-4
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NJ ASK 3 – 5
◦ Three reading passages
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NJ ASK 6 & 7
◦ Four reading passages
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Reading passages will include literature
as well as informational or “everyday”
reading selections
Additional field-test passages and items
will be included
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Grades 6 -8
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◦ 36 Multiple Choice
◦ 4 Open-Ended
◦ 2 Writing Tasks
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Day 1:
◦ 31 Multiple Choice
◦ 3 Open-Ended
◦ 2 Writing Tasks
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◦ 1 hr 45 minutes
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Day 2:
◦ 1 hr 50 minutes – 2
hrs 10 minutes
Grade 5
Day 1:
◦ 90 minutes
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Day 2:
◦ 90 minutes
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Grade 4
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◦ 18 Multiple Choice
◦ 3 Open Ended
◦ 2 Writing Tasks
◦ 27 Multiple Choice
◦ 3 Open-Ended
◦ 2 Writing Tasks
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Day 1:
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Day 2:
◦ 90 minutes
Day 1:
◦ 90 minutes
◦ 90 minutes
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Grade 3
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Day 2:
◦ 90 minutes
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The speculative prompt will be presented as a brief
scenario. Students will use that scenario as a
springboard for writing a story, drawing on stories they
have read as well as their own experiences to develop
ideas for their stories.
There are two formats for assessing
explanatory/expository writing: one will introduce a topic
in a brief verbal prompt and ask students to develop a
composition about that topic; the second format begins
with a poem that introduces a topic. That topic is
elaborated further by a brief verbal prompt that students
will use as a basis for writing their composition.
For each writing task, students will have 30 minutes to
plan and develop their story or composition.
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The speculative prompt presents a brief scenario which
students will use as a springboard for writing a story,
drawing on stories they have read as well as on their
own experiences.
Explanatory prompts present students with a topic
based on a quotation or adage, or based on a familiar
subject. Each is a springboard for the student to write
an essay. Explanatory writing is used to share
knowledge and to convey ideas and experience.
Explanatory writing may be based on the writer’s
personal knowledge and experience or on information
presented to the writer.
Persuasive writing tasks elicit the student’s point of
view on a given controversy or topic arising from
interpersonal, school/community, or social contexts.
Most people have a special activity or
hobby that they enjoy. Some people
collect things while others like to read
or play games. What activity do you
like to do?
Write a composition describing what
you enjoy doing. Explain why that
activity is special to you
(Students first listen to and read the Shel Silverstein
poem “Moon-Catchin’ Net”)
Has there ever been something you wanted very much
that you may or may not have been able to get? Write
about what you wanted. Include the following:
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What did you want to have and why did you want this?
If you got it, explain how it happened and why you
were successful.
If you didn’t get it, explain why not.
Explain how you might be successful in getting it in
the future.
When the school bell rang, Katie and Pablo
grabbed their books and raced out of the
classroom. They had been looking forward to
this afternoon all week long. Today they were
going to go on an adventure.
Write a story about the adventure Katie and Pablo
had after they left school.
Many students enjoy doing something
special for their family and friends. For
example, they may take care of their younger
sibling or help to cook a favorite meal.
Write a letter to your family or friends that
describes something special that you would
like to do for them. Explain why this would
be something special and how your family or
friends might react. Be sure to include
details and facts to support your
explanation.
Life can be full of pleasant surprises. Identify
a time when you experienced a pleasant
surprise.
Write a composition for your teacher about a
time when you experienced a pleasant
surprise. Explain why this surprise was
unexpected and how it affected your life in a
positive way. Be sure to explain your choice
by using details and examples.
Consider how the following quotation is
related to you.
“Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run
over if you just sit there.”
--Will Rogers
Cherokee-American, cowboy, comedian,
and actor
Write an essay for your language arts teacher
explaining what this quotation means to you. Use
details, reasons, and examples in your explanation.
WRITING SITUATION
A well-known musical group has offered to give a
free concert at your school. There has been much
debate as to when the concert should be held –
during or after school. You decide to write a letter
to your principal expressing your opinion about
when the concert should be held.
WRITING TASK
Write a letter to your principal supporting your
position whether the concert should be held during
school time or held after school. Use reasons,
facts, examples and/or other evidence to support
your position.
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MC - multiple choice
◦ 1 raw score point
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SCR - short constructed-response
◦ 1 raw score point
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ECR - extended constructed-response
◦ 3 raw score point
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Grades 6 - 8
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◦ 42 Multiple Choice
◦ 10 SCR
◦ 5 ECR
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Day 1:
◦ 43 Multiple Choice
◦ 10 SCR
◦ 5 ECR
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◦ 64 minutes
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Day 2:
◦ 69 minutes
Grade 5
Day 1:
◦ 68 minutes
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Day 2:
◦ 68 minutes
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Grades 3 & 4
◦ 43 Multiple Choice
◦ 8 SCR
◦ 4 ECR
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Day 1:
◦ 63 minutes
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Day 2:
◦ 68 minutes
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The Short Constructed Response (SCR) part of
NJASK grades 3 through 8 will be non-calculator
active for all students, including students with
disabilities.
In grades 3 and 4, calculators will be permitted
on one of the five remaining parts. This part will
include multiple choice items and one extended
constructed response (ECR) item.
In grades 5 – 8, calculators will be permitted on
three of the five remaining parts. These parts
will include multiple choice and extended
constructed response (ECR) items.
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All students are prohibited from using a
calculator during the non-calculator
active parts of the math test
However, students whose IEP/504 plan
allows for its use may use a calculator
and or approved manipulatives on the
MC and ECR parts of the test of the test
if the accommodations is documented in
the IEP/504 plan.
Point
Breakdown
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grades
6-8
20
20
14
13
Standard 2
Geometry and Measurement
11
11
12
13
Standard 3
Patterns and Algebra
11
11
12
13
8
8
12
13
Standard 1
Number Sense and Numerical
Operations
Standard 4
Data Analysis, Probability and
Discrete Math
Grade 3
 Item: A lunch menu has 3 beverage selections: water,
juice, and milk. The menu also offers 2 sandwich
selections: turkey and peanut butter. How many
different meals of one beverage and one sandwich
are possible? (answer: 6)
Grade 4
 Inez has a toy car collection. She has 55 red cars, 67
blue cars, and 123 orange cars. How many cars does
she have in all? (answer: 245)
Grade 5
 A gallon contains 128 ounces. Paul wants to divide 3
gallons of apple cider equally among the 2 dozen
friends at his party. How many ounces of apple cider
will each friend receive? (answer: 16)
Grade 6
 How many ways can a teacher choose 2 students
from a group of 4 students? (Answer: 6)
Grade 7
 On a map, the distance from the library to the park
is 7¼ inches. If the map uses the scale ½ inch = 1
mile, what is the actual distance, in miles, from the
park to the library? (Answer: 14½ miles)
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Which number would make the number sentence 438 -?= 259 true?
 A. 217
 B. 211
 C. 189
 D. 179*
What is the difference of 23.79 –4.93?
 A. 12.86
 B. 18.86*
 C. 19.86
 D. 21.26
If 14 x n = 252, what is the value of n?
 A. 13
 B. 18*
 C. 23
 D. 28
The NJ ASK Science assesses 10 core
curriculum content standards – with a focus
on the Life, Physical and Earth clusters.
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Scientific Processes
Science and Society
Mathematical Applications
Nature and Process of
Technology
Characteristics of Life
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Chemistry
Physics
Earth Science
Astronomy and Space
Science
Environmental Studies
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Science assessment includes four sections, each
containing ten multiple choice questions and one open
ended question.
Each multiple choice item is worth one point; each openended item is worth up to three points. Each open-ended
item is scored using an item-specific rubric
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Duration of Test – 60 minutes
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Life Science (Life & Environment) –40% of the test
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Physical Science (Physics & Chemistry)–30% of the test
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Earth Science (Geology and Astronomy)–30% of the test
Celestial objects like stars can be seen on a clear
night using
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A. a microscope
B. binoculars
C. a graduated cylinder
D. a thermometer
Victor has two glasses. One glass has ice cubes and
the other is filled with water. Give three ways the
ice and water are different.
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After School Tutoring using a variety of NJASK Test Prep
materials ie.: Barrons Literacy & Math, Instructivism ELA,
Coach Science, Measuring Up ELA & Math, Buckle Down
ELA, Math
Small group instruction based on school & district
selection test, unit, and benchmark data.
On Demand Open-ended prompt test samples and
writing prompts
Exposing our students to the type of questions they will
see on the NJASK
◦ Assessments
◦ Released sample questions from Dept. of Education
◦ Homework packets of sample questions
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To analyze and compare data over the years to
identify areas of strengths and weaknesses
To examine test scores to identify areas of
strengths and weaknesses on a grade level and for
individual students.
To analyze data and plan instruction based on
student needs
To integrate test taking strategies across the
curriculum
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Check to see students are reading everyday
• Read with your child (Books, Newspapers, Magazines)
• Help students use the rubric to score their response to
OE questions.
• Regularly discuss with your child the main idea,
author’s purpose and the theme of the story.
• Delve deeply into the book to compare characters and summarize
problem and solution of the story.
• Allow children to discuss with you openly about areas for
improvements
We prepare our students for math by…
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Mathematics Curriculum (Investigation)
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Sample tests and analyze student data to plan for
Instructions
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Instructional support as needed
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Problem of the Day (POD)
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Connect to real world
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Review materials as needed
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Kid friendly rubric
 Allow students to use various strategies to answer
questions
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Use rubric to score their response to OE questions
Have students create questions for an answer
Have students answer questions using pictures, numbers
and words (if applicable)
Have students find more than one answer for a given
problem (making change)
Review materials from the beginning of the year frequently
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Do NOT skip introductory
statements, openings, or
summary for a passage to
follow. A question usually is
answered in this section.
Fill in a choice for every
answer.
Check back in selection for
answers!!!!!!
Help students become
accustomed to language of
the test. Review direction
words.
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READ directions. They may contain a helpful tip.
For multiple choice items, have students guess when they have no
idea or to leave the bubble blank depending on whether test is
counting right answers or deducting for wrong ones.
Use the text, not your life to pick your answer
Sometimes it’s important to refer to your life. Prior experience with
vocabulary may trigger the meaning.
Learn to read questions
Consider what the question is asking. Choose answers that relate
to the question. Teach kids how not to get seduced by facts of the
story that were repeated in the answer choice .
Risk an unfamiliar choice. Encourage students to choose a
strange word when the other choices have been eliminated.
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Use elimination to choose ONE answer. After reading the stem, get rid of
the WRONG options.
Check your answers. Revisit questions that give you trouble. Revisit NOT
questions.
Abandon negativity. Read the text like you are very interested.
Summarize. Summarizing helps you get the BIG PICTURE that is important
when answering about the details.
Prioritize. Do the easy questions first and skip the difficult ones. Do the
difficult ones when you finish the easy ones. Note the difficult one wit a tiny
dot on the answer sheet next to the number. Remember to go back and
erase the dot.
Simplify. Dense text may look overwhelming but may NOT be difficult to
read. Use an index card or sheet of paper to block out distractions.
Build reading stamina. Provide opportunities to read for sustained periods
of time
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The option is usually incorrect if it contains very definite language like
always, never, none, all, etc. Few answers are so clear.
The option is often correct if it contains more negotiable language like often,
probably, some, usually, etc.
If the stem can be answered by using ONLY your memory or experience,
you have chosen the wrong option.
Watch for true answers – even facts from the story- that do not relate to the
stem. Check to see if the answers are correct.
Clean up all stray marks on answer sheets that might be scanned.
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Normal Routines
Balanced Breakfast
Try Your Best
Attendance/Arrival
Share Relaxation
Techniques
Be Positive
ONE test
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NJCCS
www.state.nj.us/education/assessment
New Jersey Department of Education
www.state.nj.us/education/
Search Keywords… “NJASK”
“state standardized tests New Jersey”
“released NJASK questions”
Feel free to contact the Leadership Team and
Guidance Department at (973)- 266-5880
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Mrs. Racine
Ms. Callender
Mrs. Jones
Mr. Hamilton
Mrs. Chiles
Mrs. Saint Preux