Computer Literacy: A New Approach

download report

Transcript Computer Literacy: A New Approach

The Future of College Computer Literacy

The Impact of K-12 Educational Technology Standards Ken Baldauf Florida State University © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Session Outline

    The DoE 2005 National Education Technology Plan  National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) Performance Indicators  Implementation Results of College Student Tech Survey College Computer Literacy Action Plan © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Professional Profile

    

Ken Baldauf

FSU Computer Science faculty member MS in Computer Science Nine years as director of Computer Literacy @ FSU Over 5,000 students annually   CGS2060: Computer Literacy (Classroom & Webbased) CGS2064: Computer Lit II  CGS2100: MicroApps for Business (Classroom & Webbased) Assisted by 30 CS grad teaching assistants © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Teaching Challenges

Q: What is the biggest challenge in designing and teaching a college computer literacy course?

A: Meeting the needs of students with varying levels of skills –keeping the course interesting for the tech savvy without losing the novices.

If only the computer knowledge and skills of incoming students were consistent!

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Examining K-12 Computer Ed

   Florida’s Sunshine State Standards The Sunshine State Standards were approved by the State Board of Education in 1996 to provide expectations for student achievement in Florida. 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

Language Arts Mathematics Science Social Studies Foreign Languages The Arts Health and Physical Education

K-12 standards allow Colleges to function more efficiently and effectively Computer Lit teachers watch and wait

No mention of technology in any of the above areas.

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

2005 National Educational Technology Plan

A New Golden Age in American K-12 Education? © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

2005 National Educational Technology Plan

  Produced by the US Department of Education as a requirement of the

No Child Left Behind

(NCLB) Act of 2001 Studies the current state of technology use in the K-12 curriculum, and provides an action plan for improvement http://www.nationaledtechplan.org/ © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

2005 National Educational Technology Plan

“As the field work progressed, it became obvious that while the development of educational technology was thriving, its application in our schools often was not. Over the past 10 years, 99 percent of our schools have been connected to the Internet with a 5:1 student to computer ratio. Yet, we have not realized the promise of technology in education. Essentially, providing the hardware without adequate training in its use – and in its endless possibilities for enriching the learning experience – meant that the great promise of Internet technology was frequently unrealized.” © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

“Today’s students, of almost any age, are far ahead of their teachers in computer literacy.”

Some Conclusions Reached in the National Educational Technology Plan     There is no dispute over the need for America’s students to have the knowledge and competence to compete in an increasingly technology-driven world economy. This need demands

new models of education facilitated by educational technology

. In the realm of technology, the educational community is playing catch-up. Industry is far ahead of education. And tech-savvy high school students often are far ahead of their teachers. This “digital disconnect” is a major cause of frustration among today’s students. © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Some Conclusions from the National Educational Technology Plan

60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

 Public schools that do not adapt to the technology needs of students risk becoming

increasingly irrelevant

. Students will seek other options.

28% 21% 39% School work is often or always meaningful 1983 Courses are quite or very interesting 1990 1995 School learning will be quite or very important in later life 2000

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Some Conclusions from the National Educational Technology Plan   The current ferment within the education community will lead to major changes in the way we teach, learn and manage public education. With the benefits of technology, highly trained teachers, a motivated student body and the requirements of

No Child Left Behind

, the next 10 years could see a spectacular rise in achievement – and may usher in a new golden age for American education. Student Video © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Recommendations from the National Educational Technology Plan 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

Strengthen Leadership Consider Innovative Budgeting Improve Teacher Training Support e-Learning and Virtual Schools Encourage Broadband Access Move Toward Digital Content  A move away from reliance on textbooks to the use of digital content Integrate Data Systems © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

No Child Left Behind

  Goals Include   Every child can read by the 3rd grade.

Students are technology literate by the 8th grade.

requires states and school districts across the country to reexamine their standards, set targets for improvement, and introduce rigorous testing. © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

National Educational Technology Standards (NETS)

A Catalyst for No Child Left Behind

“We cannot assume that our schools will naturally drift toward using technology effectively. We must commit ourselves to staying the course and making the changes necessary to reach our goals of educating every child. These are ambitious goals, but they are goals worthy of a great nation such as ours. Together, we can use technology to ensure that no child is left behind.” -George W. Bush

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

NETS

   Developed by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) Established in 1998, the primary goal of the ISTE NETS Project is to enable stakeholders in Pre K-12 education to develop national standards for educational uses of technology that facilitate school improvement in the United States.

The endorsed standards for NCLB © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

NETS Supports a New Learning Environment

Traditional Learning Environments

Teacher-centered instruction Single sense stimulation Single path progression Single media Isolated work Information delivery Passive learning Factual, knowledge-based learning Reactive response Isolated, artificial context

New Learning Environments

Student-centered learning Multisensory stimulation Multipath progression Multimedia Collaborative work Information Exchange Active/exploratory/inquiry-based learning Critical thinking and informed decision making Proactive/planned action Authentic, real-world context © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Adoption of NETS

 As of May 2004, 49 states have adopted, adapted, aligned with, or otherwise referenced NETS in their state technology plans, certification, licensure, curriculum plans, assessment plans, or other official state documents.

http://cnets.iste.org/docs/States_using_NETS.pdf

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Three NETS

NETS for Students

(37 states)

NETS for Teachers

(37 states)

NETS for Administrators

(36 states) The National Educational Technology Standards for Students is designed to provide teachers, technology planners, teacher preparation institutions, and educational decision makers with

frameworks and standards to guide them in establishing enriched learning environments supported by technology

.

The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) NETS for Teachers Project, a US Department of Education,

Preparing Tomorrow's Teachers to Use Technology

grant facilitated a series of activities and events resulting in a national consensus on

what teachers should know about and be able to do with technology

. The National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) for Administrators developed through the Technology Standards for School Administrators ( TSSA ) Collaborative identifies knowledge and skills constituting the "core" of

be able to do with technology

specific job role.

what every P-12 administrator needs to know about and

regardless of © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

NETS for Students

The new educational paradigm of fully integrated technology © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

NETS for Students

 NETS technology foundation standards for students are divided into six broad categories  Basic operations and concepts of tech systems      Social, ethical, and human issues Technology productivity tools Technology communications tools Technology research tools Technology problem-solving and decision making tools © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

NETS for Students

 Provides performance indicators, curriculum examples, and scenarios in categories:     PreK - 2 Grades 3 - 5 Grades 6 - 8 Grades 9 - 12 Curriculum Example © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Performance Indicators PreK-2

Prior to completion of Grade 2, students will

        Use educational software, interactive books, etc.

Develop a basic technology vocabulary Practice responsible use of technology systems and software Create developmentally appropriate multimedia products with assistance Use technology resources for problem solving, communication, and illustration of ideas Use the Web and Email Demonstrate positive social and ethical behaviors when using technology.

Work collaboratively using technology © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Performance Indicators PreK-2

Mostly accomplished through Integrating technology into daily lessons!

Teachers as Technology Mentors © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

P-2 Software

         Assorted Educational Concept-mapping Desktop Publishing Drawing/Painting Email Graphing HyperStudio Kid Pix Studio Mapping       Multimedia-authoring Multimedia encyclopedia Presentation Web browsing Web page creation Word-processing © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Performance Indicators Grades 3-5

 Prior to completion of Grade 5, in addition to previously addressed skills, students will:     Discuss advantages and disadvantages of common uses of technology in daily life.

Discuss basic issues related to responsible use of technology and information and describe personal consequences of inappropriate use. Use technology tools for individual and collaborative writing, communication, and publishing activities to create knowledge products for audiences inside and outside the classroom. Use telecommunications efficiently to access remote information in support of direct and independent learning, and pursue personal interests. © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Performance Indicators Grades 3-5

 Prior to completion of Grade 5, in addition to previously addressed skills, students will:    Use telecommunications and online resources (e.g., e-mail, online discussions, Web environments) to participate in collaborative problem-solving activities Determine which technology is useful and select the appropriate tool(s) and technology resources to address a variety of tasks and problems.

Evaluate the accuracy, relevance, appropriateness, comprehensiveness, and bias of electronic information sources.

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Grades 3-5 Software

      Previously mentioned software + Database Spreadsheet Geometry Rendering or illustration Digital audio recording © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Performance Indicators Grades 6-8

 Prior to completion of Grade 8, in addition to previously addressed skills, students will:     Apply strategies for identifying and solving routine hardware and software problems that occur during everyday use. Demonstrate knowledge of current changes in information technologies and the effect those changes have on the workplace and society. Design, develop, publish, and present products (e.g., Web pages, videotapes) using technology resources that demonstrate and communicate curriculum concepts to audiences.

Demonstrate an understanding of concepts underlying hardware, software, and connectivity, and of practical applications to learning and problem solving.

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Grades 6-8 Software

     Previously mentioned software + digital art CAD or home design The Geometer's Sketchpad video-production

By this time students will have had experience with:

   PCs Printers Scanners       Digital Cameras Digital Camcorders Laserdisc Players CD’s DVD’s VCR And many other peripherals © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Performance Indicators Grades 9-12

 Prior to completion of Grade 12, in addition to previously addressed skills, students will:     Make informed choices among technology systems, resources, and services. Analyze advantages and disadvantages of widespread use and reliance on technology in the workplace and in society as a whole. Demonstrate and advocate for legal and ethical behaviors among peers, family, and community regarding the use of technology and information. Use technology tools and resources for managing and communicating personal/professional information (e.g., finances, schedules, addresses, purchases, correspondence) © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Performance Indicators Grades 9-12

 Prior to completion of Grade 12, in addition to previously addressed skills, students will:     Routinely and efficiently use online information resources to meet needs for collaboration, research, publications, communications, and productivity. Select and apply technology tools for research, information analysis, problem-solving, and decision-making in content learning. Investigate and apply expert systems, intelligent agents, and simulations in real-world situations. Evaluate technology-based options, including distance and distributed education, for lifelong learning.

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Observations Re: NETS

   NETS fully integrates technology in all aspects of the curriculum –all teachers become, in essence, computer literacy teachers (technology mentors).

If and when NETS for Students is effectively implemented, graduating 12 graduating college students.

th graders will be more computer literate than today’s There is increasing pressures on public schools to align with these standards.

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Implementing NETS

Requirements and Challenges © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Requirements for Effective Implementation of NETS

  Technology Infrastructure  Over the past 10 years, 99 percent of our schools have been connected to the Internet with a 5:1 student to computer ratio. Maintaining and improving infrastructure is an ongoing challenge.

Teacher Training  States like Florida are adding technology requirements to program approval for colleges of education, teacher performance evaluations, and certification. The situation will improve as the Web generation takes over faculty positions.

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Requirements for Effective Implementation of NETS

  Revising State Standards to Align with NETS   Florida is revising its Sunshine State Standards to comply with NETS.

Florida is also implementing portions of NETS through its School Technology and Readiness (STaR) Chart.

Student and Teacher Assessment    Assessment for NETS is in development on state and local levels. FL teachers to be tested Dec 2006.

National Educational Technology Standards Rubrics are being developed by the North Central Regional Educational Lab ( http://www.ncrel.org/tech/nets/rubrics.htm

) and others.

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

When Will We See Results?

   Deadlines exist for NCLB which hopes to be fully implemented by 2014.

NETS relies on a computer competent faculty:   continuing ed classes for existing faculty improved teaching degree programs  and generational transition …may take until 2014.

Implementing new standards with assessment may take until 2014.

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

When Will We See Results

    Assume NETS is fully and effectively implemented in all states by 2014.

The first class of students to fully experience a NETS education from P-12 would enter college in 2028 (14 years later).

From now until then we should experience an increasing amount of students who enter college fully computer literate.

We are already seeing results….

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Transitions in College Computer Literacy Programs

Preparing for the Millennials © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Today’s Students

Results of FSU Technology Survey (3,252 Comp Lit Students)     97% of FSU students surveyed own a computer  Only 4% own an Apple 87% own a cell phone 43% own a digital camera (up 22% from last year) 26% own a portable MP3 player or iPod (up 15%) © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Today’s Students

Results of FSU Technology Survey (3,252 Comp Lit Students)

Digital Communications Use

100% 80%

3,252 FSU Students

60% 40% 20% 0%

99%

Email

88% 87% 67%

Instant Messaging Cell Phone Texting © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Today’s Students

Results of FSU Technology Survey (3,252 Comp Lit Students) Student Experience with Software

Program

Word Excel Access PowerPoint

2003-04 Students

99.15% 52.88% 13.05% 69.36%

2004-05 Students

99.35% 75.80% 51.20% 84.69%

Difference

↑ 0.20% ↑ 22.92% ↑ 38.15% ↑ 15.33% © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Pre-college Skills Aquisition

Computer Programming Web Design Apple Computer Microsoft Outlook Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft Works Microsoft PowerPoint Computer Concepts File Management Web Research Microsoft Word Microsoft Windows Email 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60%

3,252 FSU Students

70% 80% 90% 100% Formal training Self-taught None

The Important Question

What happens to the college computer literacy class when survey results look like this?

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Pre-college Skills Aquisition

Computer Programming Web Design Apple Computer Microsoft Outlook Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft Works Microsoft PowerPoint Computer Concepts File Management Web Research Microsoft Word Microsoft Windows Email 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Formal training Self-taught None

Planning for the Future

 College Computer Literacy programs must begin transitioning now to accommodate increasing numbers of computer competent students.

Pre-college Skills Aquisition

Computer Programming Web Design Apple Computer Microsoft Outlook Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft Works Microsoft PowerPoint Computer Concepts File Management Web Research Microsoft Word Microsoft Windows Email 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

3,252 FSU Students

Formal training Self-taught None T R A N S I T I O N

Pre-college Skills Aquisition

Computer Programming Web Design Apple Computer Microsoft Outlook Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft Works Microsoft PowerPoint Computer Concepts File Management Web Research Microsoft Word Microsoft Windows Email 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60%

3,252 FSU Students

70% 80% 90% 100% Formal training Self-taught None 2005 2010 2015 2020 © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Plan of Action

Accommodating Increasing amounts of Computer Competent Students © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Action Step 1: Provide College-level Knowledge

   There should be a difference between what is considered high school computer competency and college computer competency.

Increase the demands of the Intro course to focus on college-level problem solving and issues.

Add an advanced course for students who are already computer literate with a focus on marketable skills for the job market.

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Computer Lit & Comp Lit II @ FSU

Computer Skills

Using Microsoft Windows Managing Files E-mail Web Research Microsoft Word Microsoft Excel Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Office Application Integration Creating a Webpage with Word Microsoft Access Digital Photo Editing: Adobe Photoshop Computer Graphics: Adobe Illustrator Computer Animation: Macromedia Flash Basics of Unix (for Web publishing) Web Authoring: Intro to HTML Web Development: Macromedia DreamWeaver Microsoft Data Access Pages Basics of Web Programming with JavaScript

COMP LIT

X X X X X X X X X X

COMP LIT II

X X X X X X X X X X

Computer Lit & Comp Lit II @ FSU

Computer Concepts

Digital Data Representation Hardware Software Telecommunications and Networking Internet/Web Societal, Ethical, and Security Issues Digital Media (Graphics, Video, Music, Games) Database Systems E-commerce and Transaction Processing Information Systems in Businesses & Organizations Systems and Software Development

COMP LIT

X X X X X X

COMP LIT II

X X X X X X

Action Step 2: Assessment and Placement

 Implement computer skills and knowledge assessment for all incoming Freshmen for placement into appropriate level class. Comp Lit Comp Lit II Exempt © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Action Step 2: Assessment and Placement

 Over time, as increasing numbers of students enter college already computer competent, enrollment levels in Comp Lit and Comp Lit II should invert

Comp Lit Comp Lit II

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Action Step 3: Servicing Degree Programs

 Offer special-focus classes that cater to the needs of specific degree programs.

 departments can “outsource” special focus computer lit classes  At FSU the CS dept. offers

MicroApps for Business and Economics

as a service to the College of Business © 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Conclusion

In the not too distant future, there will be no such thing as “College Computer Literacy” and no need for an “Intro Computer Course”. Those of us teaching such a class today, if we are not retired, will be involved in testing, remedial teaching, perhaps teaching a general ed advanced technology class to prepare students for professional life, or advanced teaching for Tech majors, or specific degree programs.

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Conclusion

Until that day, our job is to provide the essential technical training and understanding that are so very important in today’s careers and that still many students lack, while implementing systems that provide paths for students around topics and skills that they have already acquired.

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.

Thanks for your time.

Ken Baldauf Florida State University [email protected]

850-644-5832 http://lit.cs.fsu.edu

http://www.kenbaldauf.com

Sources

     National Technology Educational Technology Plan Website: http://www.nationaledtechplan.org/ ISTE NETS Website: http://cnets.iste.org/index.shtml

NETS Rubrics, North Central Regional Educational Laboratory Website: http://www.ncrel.org/tech/nets/rubrics.htm

Netday Speak Up Day (K-12 Student Survey) Website: http://www.netday.org/ “Q&A: Ruben Lopez, Florida's Chief Technology Officer”, Matthew Miller,

The Journal

, May 2003: http://www.thejournal.com/magazine/vault/A4417.cfm

© 2004 Ken Baldauf, All rights reserved.