Knotweed Control within the Prairie Cr Sub

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Transcript Knotweed Control within the Prairie Cr Sub

AN OVERVIEW OF THE
QUINAULT INDIAN NATION's
ONGOING INVOLVEMENT WITH
THE EXCHANGE NETWORK
GRANT PROGRAM
NCAI Tribal Exchange Network Meeting
Palm Springs, CA
April 2008
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- Reservation covers ~207,000 acres
- Plus fishing and hunting rights outside
in the “Usual & Accustomed” Areas
- Contains 600 plus miles of mapped rivers
& streams
- >25 water quality monitoring sites
- Collect ph, dissolved oxygen, temperature,
turbidity, E-coli, & analytes for organic
compounds and metals, & tissue samples
- One air quality monitoring site, to monitor the
effects of slash pile burnings from timber
harvests
- Off-reservation the Nation has co-management
responsibilities of multiple fisheries with the
State of Washington: salmon, crab, razor clams,
amongst many
- The air and water quality programs have been
ongoing for 7+ years – much data has been
collected
- Both programs are supported by EPA-funding
- EPA funding of the water quality program comes
from several grants:
- 106 funding
- 319 funding
- GAP funding
Past Activities:
- Applied for and received an Exchange Network
Readiness Grant in FY2004
- This grant was primarily used to “beef up”
the tribal network’s infrastructure:
- Purchased new server, GIS workstations
- Built up principal network backbone to transmit
data at gigabit speed
- Funded training for server administration and
intranet mapping capability development
The “Business” Drivers::
- The Quinault Nation has business needs to
consolidate the accumulated water quality
data into a unified database to make the
- information more usable and accessible
- The EPA has mandated water quality data
reporting for its 106-funded grants since 2006,
prior to that it was voluntary
- Application by the Nation for “treatment as a “state”
by the EPA with respect to water quality
standards
- The Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission has
received an Exchange Network grant to establish
a WQX node, along with providing outreach
- and technical support to its member tribes
- The Nation is a Commission member tribe, and
has been designated one of two pilots for testing
- The Water Quality Exchange has “matured” with
regards to standards and developed schemas
The Future:
- The Nation has submitted a grant proposal
for a second round of Exchange Network funding
- This grant’s principal goals are:
- Consolidate all water quality data into a
a single database
- Map the existing water quality data to the
WQX schema and establish workflows to
incorporate future data
- Migrate this database to SQL Server 2005 to
provide secure, managed, multi-user access to
the data
- establish a client node and test its connection to
the NWIFC WQX node, in anticipation of establishing
a production node
- Provide for an additional server to allow for the
separation of applications server and the data
management server functions
- Support tribal participation in the Exchange
Network’s governance structure,
specifically the Network Technical Group (NTG)
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Extend the network’s gigabit transmission to
the tribal Planning department located in the
lower village to enhance their data access
capabilities
Some Issues & Concerns:
- Tribal concern over the release of data into
the “public” domain – its uses and potential
adverse impacts
- The ability to attract and keep the IT personnel
necessary to operate and maintain the exchange
infrastructure, given the constant changes that arise
from ongoing changes in the associated technologies
- The desire to see the incorporation of geospatial
capabilities to the Exchange Network. See the data
in the context of a “map” - like in Google Earth
What we wish to protect and sustain
for the future
THANK YOU
Questions: Please contact Tony Hartrich, QDNR GIS Program Manager
Phone: 360-276-8215, ext. 479
e-mail: [email protected]