Creating Content Area Classrooms that Work for English

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Transcript Creating Content Area Classrooms that Work for English

Welcome

Session Norms

: •All pagers and cell phones on vibrate •Stay on topic being discussed •Use professional courtesy

H igh Q uality S heltered I nstruction:

Building Background

Presented by Region Specialist June 28, 2007

Housekeeping

Explain the time schedule for your day. Include items like: breaks, location of restrooms, lunch, etc.

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• • • • • • • •

H igh Q uality S heltered I nstruction

“Sheltered Instruction is an approach to teaching content to English language learners in strategic ways that make the subject matter concepts comprehensible while promoting the students’ English language development.” --Echevarria, Vogt, and Short Lesson Preparation Building Background Comprehensible Input Strategies Interaction Practice/Application Lesson Delivery Review/Assessment

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Session Objectives

• •

Content Objectives: Recognize

the importance of building background knowledge to lesson concepts.

Identify

strategies for linking past learning with new information.

Language Objectives: Read

and

discuss

how to teach key vocabulary and incorporate vocabulary development activities into lessons.

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Features of Building Background

• Concepts explicitly linked to students’ background experiences • Links explicitly made between past learning and new concepts • Key vocabulary emphasized (e.g., introduced, written, repeated, and highlighted for students to see) Vogt, M., Echevarria, J. (2006).

Teaching Ideas for Implementing the SIOP Model

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Schema Activity

• Complete the cloze activity by yourself 7

Complete the Scaffolded Cloze

The questions that p_____ m_____ face as they raise ch_____ from in_____to adult life are not easy to an_____. Both f______ and m______ can become concerned when health problems such as c______ arise any time after the e______stage to later life. Experts recommend the young ch______ should have plenty of s______ and nutritious food for healthy growth. B_____and g_____ should not share the same b_____or even sleep in the same r_____. They may be afraid of the d_____.

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The questions that poultry men chickens from incubation face as they raise to adult life are not easy to answer . Both farmers and merchants can become concerned when health problems such as coccidiosis arise any time after the egg stage to later life. Experts recommend the young chicks plenty of growth. sunshine should have and nutritious food for healthy Banties and geese should not share the same barnyard or even sleep in the same roost . They may be afraid of the dark .

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A Marsden Giberter

Glis was very fraper. She had dernarpen Farfle’s marsden. She did not talp a giberter for him. So, she conlanted to plimp a marsden binky for him. She had just sparved the binky when he jibbed in the gorger.

“Clorsty marden!” she boffed.

“That’s a crouistish marsden binky,” boffed Farfle, “but my marsden is on Stansan. Agsan is Kelsan.” “In that ruspen,” boffed Glis, “I won’t wank you your giberter until Stansan.” 10

Comprehension Check

1. Why was Glis fraper?

2. What did Glis plimp?

3. Who jibbed the gorger when Glis sparved the blinky?

4. Why didn’t Glis wank Farfle his giberter?

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Schema, knowledge of the world…

“…provides a basis for understanding, learning, and remembering facts and ideas found in stories and texts. Individuals with knowledge of a topic have better recall and are better able to elaborate on aspects of the topic than those who have limited knowledge of the topic.” Echevarria, Vogt and Short,

Making Content Comprehensible for English Language Learners,

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Schema

• The word schema comes from the Greek word "σχήμα" (skhēma), which means shape or more generally plan.

• The word

schema

can represent any of several different things: – e.g. In computer science, a schema is a model.

In our school setting, schema is …

Prior Knowledge 13

Schema

is like

Velcro

in the brain

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Reflection

To what extent is there discrepancy between students’ experiences and what you believe they have experienced?

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Links to Background Knowledge

Remember… students from different cultural/socio-economic environments will not have had the same prior personal experiences.

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Building Background

Link new concepts to previous knowledge 17

Crystallized (learned) Intelligence

Background Knowledge Working Memory Permanent Memory

Sensory Memory 18

Building Background: Importance of the Language Base

• • • • Identify key vocabulary essential to understanding the content.

Pre-teach these essential words.

Provide experiences.

Introduce framework.

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Six Step Process for Teaching New Terms

Step 1: Provide a description, explanation, or example of the term as well as a non-linguistic representation for ELL.

Step 2: Ask students to restate the description, explanation, or example in their own words.

Step 3: Ask students to construct a picture, symbol, or graphic representing the term.

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Six Step Process for Teaching New Terms

Step 4: Engage students in activities that help them add to their knowledge of the terms in their notebooks.

Step 5: Periodically ask students to discuss their terms with each other.

Step 6: Involve students in games that allow them to play with terms.

Marzano, R., Pickering, D. (2005)

Building Academic Vocabulary.

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Video Presentation

Building Background

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Teaching Scenarios

Refer to Building Background section for teaching scenarios.

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Teaching Scenarios

• All participants will read the lesson overview.

• Participants will number off into threes.

• Ones will read first scenario and so forth.

• Rate the teacher using rating scale provided.

• Discuss your rating with group and come to consensus.

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All students have background knowledge… BUT… Not all students have academic background knowledge 26

Review Session Objectives

• •

Content Objectives: Recognize

the importance of building background knowledge to lesson concepts.

Identify

strategies for linking past learning with new information.

Language Objectives: Read

and

discuss

how to teach key vocabulary and incorporate vocabulary development activities into lessons.

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Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result.

--Albert Einstein 28

My Aha Moment!

Presentation Topic: Presenter: Date: Two ideas that were interesting to me: 1.

2.

Two ways I can apply the information presented in my classroom: 1.

2.

Two questions that I have for the presenter: 1.

2.

Two things I wish the presenter had done differently: 1.

2.

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References

Echevarria, J., Short, D., Vogt, M. E. (2004).

Making Content Comprehensible: The SIOP Model. 2nd ed.

Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.

Marzano, R. J. (2004).

Building Background Knowledge for Academic Achievement: Research on What Works in Schools.

Alexandria, VA.: ASCD. Marzano, R. J. & Pickering, D. (2005).

Building Academic Vocabulary: Teacher’s Manual.

Alexandria, VA.: ASCD.

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