JUVENILE MINORITY SENSITIVITY TRAINING

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Transcript JUVENILE MINORITY SENSITIVITY TRAINING

JUVENILE MINORITY
SENSITIVITY TRAINING
Understanding
Generation Y
Training Objectives
• Discuss what encompasses the culture of
Generation Y including family issues,
mental illness issues, drug use and
cultural norms.
• Identify problems that the criminal justice
system is experiencing when dealing with
some members of Generation Y.
Training Objectives
• Discuss effective intervention techniques
that agencies and communities are using
or could use to deal with the problems
presented by members of Generation Y.
CHPD Crisis Unit Overview
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30th Year in existence
4 FT Staff, 7 Contract
24/7 Response
Office: 0800-2200 M-F
Multiple Response
Presentations
Internal and External
Completely incorporated
into police operations and
organization.
Typical Response
Requests
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Death Notification
Domestic Violence
Family Conflict
Sex Crimes
Traumatic Injury MVA
Violent Crime:
– Home Invasion
– Muggings
– Assaults with injury
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Psychiatric Emergencies
Elder Issues
Child Abuse and Neglect
Armed Robberies
Structure Fires
Armed Robberies
Mentally Ill: victim & perp.
Barricaded/Hostage
Critical Incident Scene
Management
Traditionalists (Born before 1946)
• WW II Generation
• Born before 1946
• Practical, dedicated,
strong work ethic
• Believes in authority
and that there should
be a hierarchy
• Civic minded and
loyal to public duty
Baby Boomers (1946 to 1960)
• Work ethic is driven
• The job is not the
most important thing
to them.
• View of authority is a
love/hate relationship
• Team oriented and
are motivated by
team interaction.
GENERATION X
• 70’s & 80’s children
• “Latchkey kids”
• Skeptical,
unimpressed with
authority
• Demand
competence in
supervisors/leaders
• Self-reliant
Generation Y
• Biggest group in
America since the
Baby Boomers
• 60 million persons
strong
• The most racially
diverse group ever
Family Issues- Structure
• Most children live with 2 parents
• 3 of 4 children have working mothers
• Children are very involved with family
decisions
• Study from “Child Trends”
Technology Issues
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Computers
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Internet Messaging
Web Sites
E-mail
Chat Rooms
Cellular Telephones
Main Stream Media
Credit/Debit Cards
Family Issues- Media
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HOMES WITH 2 PARENTS ARE MORE
LIKELY TO HAVE INTERNET ACCESS
EVEN WITH 2 PARENTS, THERE IS
STILL A LACK OF PARENTAL
REGULATION OF WHAT IS VIEWED
ON THE COMPUTER, OR
TELEVISION.
Internet Access & Socioeconomics
• 35% in lowest economic bracket have
Internet access
• 53% in lower-middle class bracket have
Internet access
• 79% in upper-middle class bracket have
Internet access
• 83% in the highest economic bracket have
Internet access
Television
• 1/2 of all children
have no rules about
watching TV
• 1/3 of 2 to 7 year
olds have a TV in
their bedroom, 16%
have a VCR in their
bedroom, and 13%
have a video game
player there.
Mental Illness Numbers
• As of 2001, 4.3 million youths aged 12-17
received treatment or counseling.
• 18.4% increase in this population
• Females were slightly more likely than
males to receive treatment/counseling.
Reasons
• Depressed - 49.5%
• Breaking Rules/Acting
Out - 26.7%
• Suicidal Thoughts or
Attempts- 19.5%
• Afraid or Tense19.5%
• Family/Home
Problems- 13.8%
• School Problems9.8%
• Eating Problems9.1%
• Social/Friend
Problems- 8.0%
• Other Mental
Disorders- 2.8%
• Other Problems22.3%
In a class of 25
Students….
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Five students have seriously
contemplated committing suicide
within the last year.
More than four students have made
plans at least on one occasion to
attempt suicide.
Two students are likely to have tried to
kill themselves during the past year.
SUICIDE
• 10-14 years of age
– Suicide by suffocation was the 3rd leading
cause of death.
– Suicide by firearm was the 5th leading cause
of death.
SUICIDE
15- 24 years of age
– Suicide by firearm was 3rd leading cause of
death.
– Suicide by suffocation was the 5th leading
cause of death.
– Suicide by poisoning was the 8th leader cause
of death.
Recent Trends and
Concerns
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“Blogs”
– Watch for copycat type incidents.
– Identify effected others.
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“The Choking Game”
– Not necessarily an intentional suicide
– Self-asphyxiation
– Can be self or peer induced
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Meds, Meds, Meds……
DRUG USE
Among youths aged 12-17, 11.6%
were current illicit drug users.
Emerging Drug Use
Trends
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Club Drugs
– Ecstasy, GHB, Rophynol, Ketamine, Salvia
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“Pharmy” Abuse of Prescription
Medication
– Oxycontin, Adderall, Ritalin, Sinequan
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Over the Counter
– DXM, No Doz, Diet Pills
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Old School
– Alcohol, Marijuana, Cocaine, Heroin
SALVIA
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Salvinorin, Salvia, Ska Pastora, Shepherdess's
Herb, ska Maria Pastora, yerba de Maria,
SaDi, Sally-D
Loss of coordination, uncontrollable laughter,
visual alterations or visions, experiencing
multiple realities, sense of total confusion or
madness, sense of flying, floating, twisting, or
turning, believing to travel to other places
and/or times, becoming inanimate object
15 minutes to 3 hour duration.
The Addiction Continuum
Cycle of Abuse
Pain
Euphoria
BIG WORLD
LITTLE WORLD
Addictive Risk Factors
Family History
 Age of First Use
 Use History and Patterns of Use
 Stress
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Signs of Potential
Substance Abuse
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Preoccupation With Use or Substances
Loss of Interest in Activities
Isolation From Family (secretive)
Rapid Decline in Academic Performance
Inability to Account for Money Spent
Paraphernalia Found
Changes in Social Circles
Visual and Behavioral Cues
Multiple Negative Consequences
Marijuana
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One of the largest problems in adolescent drug
use and abuse.
“Reefer”, “Weed”, “Blunt”, “420”, “Pot”
TCH levels, 2002 is 20% higher than 1980
“Amotivational Syndrome”
Confusion, Depression, Memory Loss
Intentional and Unintentional Lacing
Well-Defended, Defiance, Normalization
“Survey Says…..”
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Substance Use and Abuse (Tobacco).
– Have smoked cigarettes in last thirty
days: 27.5% HS
– Smoked 2+ on smoking days: 10.4 HS
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Marijuana
– 30DP 22.4% HS
“Survey Says…..”
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Substance Use and Abuse (ALCOHOL)
– 30.2% of High School students report at
least once riding in a car driven by
someone who had been drinking alcohol.
– Alcohol Use 74.9% lifetime prevalence,
44.9% 30DP, 28.3% Binge Drinking.
Other Common Abused
Substances
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Rohypnol
DXM
Ketamine
Prescribed Substances
Diet Pills
Cocaine/Crack
Signs of Potential
Substance Abuse
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Preoccupation With Use or Substances
Loss of Interest in Activities
Isolation From Family (secretive)
Rapid Decline in Academic Performance
Inability to Account for Money Spent
Paraphernalia Found
Changes in Social Circles
Visual and Behavioral Cues
Multiple Negative Consequences
• 8.2% Marijuana
• 1.0% Hallucinogens
• 4.0% Prescription
type drugs
• 0.6% Cocaine
(includes crack)
• 1.2% Inhalants
• The rate of use is higher for males than
females.
• The rate of illicit drug use was
approximately 8 times higher among
cigarette smokers.
• Heavy drinking can also be tied in with
drug use. 67% of those who are heavy
drinkers also use drugs.
How, from whom and where?
• 56.7% got the drug
for free or shared.
• Almost 40% bought it
• Most users
bought/got their drug
from friends.
• 9% bought inside a
school building
• 4.8% bought on
school property
Who is less likely to use?
• 78.8% reported they “liked or kind of liked
going to school.”
- Of these, only 9.3% had used an illicit drug in
the past month
• Statistics also show that the more positive
activities that a youth is involved in such as
religious activities, band, sports, dance
lessons, etc, the less likely that they will use
illicit drugs.
Alcohol Use
• Current alcohol use
increased with age
from a low of 2.0% at
the age of 12 to
36.2% at the age of
17.
• 61.3% of the heavy
alcohol users also
smoked cigarettes in
the past month.
High Risk Sexual
Behaviors
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Much misinformation given to
adolescent form peers.
Media portrayals complicate/support
this misinformation.
Sexual Activity as Group Initiation
Sexual Activity as Health Risks
Adult targeting younger child problems
Youth Risk Behavior Survey 2002
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SEXUAL BEHAVIOR (HS ONLY)
– Students in grades 9 and 10 are significantly
less likely to have sexual intercourse than their
11th and 12th grade peers.
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32.8%, 44.1%, 53.2%, 61.6%
– Adolescent males report that they have had
intercourse more often than adolescent
females 48% to 45.3%
– When isolated as a variable, ethnicity appears
to be a factor in the incidence of sexual
intercourse. (AA 67.3%, W 41.8%, L 51.4%)
More Data
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11.2% respondents report 4+ lifetime
sexual partners (17.9% of HS Seniors)
In another national survey 11%
reported 7+ lifetime sexual partners.
In teens 12-16 yrs old 7% report
being forced to do something sexual
with an adult, 17% by another
teenager.
Potential Interventions
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Middle School Years seem to be key in
development of attitudes and behaviors
surrounding sexual behavior.
Social Norming Activities
Educational information to dispel myths
or misinformation that is prevalent.
Relationship building Life Skill
Development.
Cultural norms
What’s hot?
Generation Y have:
• Always had an answering machine
• Never seen a TV set with only 13 channels, nor
seen a black and white television
• Always had cable
• Always had VCR’s and have no idea what BETA
is
• Always had remotes
• Always known Jay Leno as the host of “The
Tonight Show”
• No idea what hard contact lenses are
• Never known a time when AIDS didn’t exist
• Always popped popcorn in the microwave
• No clue how to use a typewriter
1992 USA Weekend survey
Of the 236,000 young people
surveyed:
• 25-40% of teens see nothing
wrong with cheating on exams,
stealing from employers or
keeping money that isn’t theirs.
The Issues
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Undisciplined Behavior & Runaways
Substance Abuse
Supervision of Activities
Increasing Violent Crime
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In Society
Between Youth
Domestic Violence
Gang Activities
Other Risk Taking Behaviors
– Sexual Activity
– Internet Use/Chat Rooms
General Strategies
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Networking
– Isolation & “Rule of Threes”,
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Stay Involved {Active & Aware Involvement}
– Know Peers
– Know Places
– Check-In Regularly
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Stay Current with Trends and Culture
Open Communication
Supervision
Discipline Strategies
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“It is the job of the parent to set limits” “It is
the job of the adolescent to resist the limits”
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Boundaries
Curfew
Supervised Activities (Internet, IM, e-mail)
The Two “Cs” Consistency & Consequences
Treat all instances of potential harm seriously.
Instill Accountability
Maintain Limits
Specific Problem Areas
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Situation A:
– Parents leave town for the weekend/week
and leave 17 year old “in charge” of the
premises.
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Situation B:
– Parents are aware of peer pressure being
exerted upon adolescent to drink alcohol.
Parents decide safest option is to allow party
to occur in their home where teens will not
be forced to drive, in some cases, parents
provide the alcohol.
Specific Problem Areas
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Situation C:
– Parents take teenage child and friend to movie
theater or mall. Children are dropped off in
proximity of the venue but then meet others and
engage in different activities. Are returned to
original destination for pick-up.
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Situation D:
– In an attempt to resolve conflict, parents allow
teenage child to live independently away from
home. Alternative housing location becomes
party spot for large groups of teens.