ECO Longitudinal - OSEP Leadership Mtng

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Transcript ECO Longitudinal - OSEP Leadership Mtng

Orientation to Outcomes
Lynne Kahn
Kathy Hebbeler
The Early Childhood Outcomes (ECO) Center
October 16, 2012
Early Childhood Outcomes Center
What We Will Cover
 Background on child and family outcomes
 Family Indicator C4
 Indicators C3 and B7
 The three child outcomes
 Progress categories & summary statements
 Approaches to measuring child outcomes
 Emerging trends
 Conference overview
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Background on
Measuring Outcomes
Why are state
early intervention
and preschool
special education
agencies
collecting data on
child and family
outcomes?
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Need for Outcomes Data
• Accountability
– Federal government (Office of Special
Education Programs, U.S. Department of
Education) requires that states submit data on
outcomes
– In some states, policy-makers are asking for
outcome data
• Program Improvement
– State agencies (and local programs) want to
use data on outcomes to improve services for
children and families
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Background
• Part C and Part B, Section 619 are line
items programs in IDEA funding
• OSEP had no data on these programs.
• In 2003, funded the ECO Center to
convene stakeholders to make
recommendations on the outcomes and
what to report.
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Why do we care
about outcomes for families?
• Pt. C of IDEA is based on expected benefit to
families
• Achieving child outcomes requires healthy families
• Families can be affected by having a child with a
disability- early intervention/preschool can reduce
negative impacts and promote positive adaptation
• Family outcomes may be especially important for
families whose children, despite intensive early
intervention/preschool, make relatively little progress
and suffer serious health or developmental
challenges
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Ultimate Goal for EI and ECSE:
Families
“to enable families to provide care for their
child and have the resources they need to
participate in their own desired family and
community activities. .”
Based on the ECO stakeholder process when identifying outcomes
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Considerations in Developing
Family Outcomes for Part C and 619
• How can a national system to assess family outcomes
accommodate the wide range of individualized
outcomes?
• What measurement strategies should be used that are
objective yet sensitive to the fact that many outcomes
are perceptions?
• Should a similar set of family outcomes be expected of
early intervention and preschool programs?
Early Childhood Outcomes Center
Input Process and
Recommendations
• Technical Workgroup on Family Outcomes
– Developed priority outcome statements based on
commonalities across the literature
• ECO Constituent Workgroups
– Reacted to and tweaked the resulting list of outcome
statements
– Recommended that the same set of family outcomes
be used birth through five
– Recommended family report of perceptions as the
measurement strategy
Early Childhood Outcomes Center
Stakeholder Recommendation:
Family Outcomes
1. Families understand their child’s strengths, abilities, and
special needs
2. Families know their rights and advocate effectively for
their child
3. Families help their child develop and learn
4. Families have support systems
5. Families are able to gain access to desired services and
activities in their community
Note: 1 through 3 were recommended for EI and ECSE. There was not
consensus on whether 4 and 5 applied to ECSE.
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Family Outcomes: Additional Resources
• Family and Child Outcomes for Early Intervention and
Early Childhood Special Education. The Early Childhood
Outcomes Center (April 2005)
• Recommended Outcomes for Families of Young
Children with Disabilities. Bailey, D. B. Jr., Bruder, M.B.,
Hebbeler, K., Carta, J., Defosset, M., Greenwood, C.,
Kahn, L., Mallik, S., Markowitz, J., Spiker, D., Walker, D.,
& Barton, L. (2006).
• What Is the Future of Family Outcomes and FamilyCentered Services? Bailey, D., Raspa, M., & Fox, L.
(2012).
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Family Indicator: C4
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APR Requirements for Part C
Percent of families participating in Part C who
report that EI services have helped the family:
– Know their rights
– Effectively communicate their children’s
needs
– Help their children develop and learn
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APR Requirements for Part B, Section
619 Preschool Programs
• Percent of parents with a child receiving
special education services who report that
schools facilitated parent involvement as a
means of improving services and results
for children with disabilities
• no specific indicator for preschool, nor the
expectation for examining preschool family
involvement separately from Part B
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State Approaches for Family Indicator:
2012
• Original ECO Family Outcomes Survey,
Items 16-18 (17 states)
• Revised ECO Family Outcomes Survey (6
states)*
• NCSEAM Impact on Family Scale
(25 states)
• State Survey (7 states)
*One additional state used both ECO Surveys
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Family Survey: Additional
Resources
• ECO Family Surveys
– http://projects.fpg.unc.edu/~eco/pages/tools.cf
m#SurveyVersions
• NCSEAM* Survey
– http://www.accountabilitydata.org/FamilyInvol
vmentNCSEAMMeasures.htm
*National Center for Special Education Accountability Monitoring
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Challenges Related to Family
Surveys
• Need to increase the response rates
• Determining and increasing the
representativeness of the data
• Interpreting the data to improve outcomes
for families
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Child Outcomes:
C3 and B7
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Themes from the Stakeholders:
Child Outcomes
•
•
•
•
•
•
Consistent with IDEA and legislative intent
Reflect what EI and ECSE are trying to do
Develop one set of outcomes for all disabilities
Develop one set of outcomes for birth to five
Make the outcomes functional
Have the potential to positively influence
practice; do not drive the field backwards
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Ultimate Goal for EI and ECSE
“To enable young children to be active and
successful participants during the early
childhood years and in the future in a
variety of settings – in their homes with
their families, in child care, preschool or
school programs, and in the community.”
Based on the ECO stakeholder process when identifying 3 functional outcomes
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Understanding
the Three Child
Outcomes
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Three Child Outcomes
• Children have positive social-emotional
skills (including social relationships)
• Children acquire and use knowledge and
skills (including early language/
communication [and early literacy])
• Children use appropriate behaviors to
meet their needs
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Outcomes Are Functional
Functional outcomes:
• Refer to using skills to accomplish things that
are meaningful to the child in the context of
everyday life
• Refer to an integrated series of behaviors or
skills that allow the child to achieve the important
everyday goals
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Children Have Positive
Social Relationships
• Involves:
– Relating with adults
– Relating with other children
– For older children, following rules related to
groups or interacting with others
• Includes areas like:
– Attachment/separation/autonomy
– Expressing emotions and feelings
– Learning social rules and expectations
– Social interactions and play
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Children Acquire and Use
Knowledge and Skills
• Involves:
– Thinking
– Reasoning
– Remembering
– Problem solving
– Using symbols and language
– Understanding physical and social worlds
• Includes:
– Early concepts—symbols, pictures, numbers, classification,
spatial relationships
– Imitation
– Object permanence
– Expressive and receptive language and communication
– Early literacy
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Children Take Appropriate Action to
Meet Their Needs
• Involves:
– Taking care of basic needs
– Getting from place to place
– Using tools (e.g., fork, toothbrush, crayon)
– In older children, contributing to their own health and
safety
• Includes:
– Integrating motor skills to complete tasks
– Self-help skills (e.g., dressing, feeding, grooming,
toileting, household responsibility)
– Acting on the world to get what one wants
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Taking Action to Meet Needs
• Includes
– Integrating various skills (gross motor, fine motor,
communication skills) to complete tasks
– Self help skills (feeding, dressing, toileting,
household task)
– Acting on the world to get what he or she wants
– Not JUST acting on the world: takes
APPROPRIATE action to meet needs
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Outcomes Reflect Global
Functioning
• Each outcome is a snapshot of:
– The whole child
– Status of the child’s current functioning
– Functioning across settings and situations
• Rather than:
– Skill by skill
– In one standardized way
– Split by domains
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Child Outcomes: Additional
Resources
• Family and Child Outcomes for Early
Intervention and Early Childhood Special
Education. The Early Childhood Outcomes
Center (April 2005)
• Child Outcomes Video: Step by Step
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OSEP Reporting Categories
Percentage of children who:
a. Did not improve functioning
b. Improved functioning, but not sufficient to move
nearer to functioning comparable to same-aged
peers
c. Improved functioning to a level nearer to sameaged peers but did not reach it
d. Improved functioning to reach a level
comparable to same-aged peers
e. Maintained functioning at a level comparable to
same-aged peers
3 outcomes x 5 “measures” = 15 numbers
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Who is included in the reporting
• In February 2013, states will report
progress on all children who
– Exited the program between July 1, 2011 and
June 30, 2012, and
– Were in the program for at least 6 months.
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Helping Children Move Toward AgeExpected Functioning
• Assumption: Children can be described with
regard to how close they are to age expected
functioning for each of the 3 outcomes
• By definition, most children in the general
population demonstrate the outcome in an
age-expected way
• By providing services and supports, EI and
ECSE are trying to move children closer to
age expected behavior
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F
u
n
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t
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Entry
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Entry
Exit
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Center
Entry
Exit
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Center
Key Points
• The OSEP reporting categories
describe types of progress children can
make between entry and exit
• Data from two time points (entry and
exit) are needed to calculate what
OSEP category describes a child’s
progress
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Understanding the reporting categories
a-e
e. % of children who
maintain functioning at a
level comparable to sameaged peers
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Entry
Exit
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Center
Entry
Entry
Exit
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Center
d. % of children who improve
functioning to reach a level
comparable to same-aged peers
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Entry
Entry
Exit
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Center
Entry
Exit
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Center
c. % of children who improved
functioning to a level nearer to
same aged peers, but did not
reach it
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Entry
Exit
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Center
Entry
Exit
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Center
b. % of children who improved
functioning, but not sufficient
to move nearer to same aged
peers
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Entry
Exit
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Center
Entry
Exit
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Entry
Exit
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Center
a. % of children who did not
improve functioning
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Entry
Exit
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Center
Entry
Exit
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Center
The Summary Statements
1. Of those children who entered the program
below age expectations in each Outcome,
the percent who substantially increased
their rate of growth by the time they turned
3 [6] years of age or exited the program.
c + d/ (a+b+c+d)
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The Summary Statements
2. The percent of children who were
functioning within age expectations in each
Outcome by the time they turned 3 [6] years
of age or exited the program.
d + e/(a+b+c+d+e)
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The concepts are easier than the
words or the formulas
• Summary statement 1: How many children
changed growth trajectories during their time
in the program?
• Summary statement 2: How many children
were functioning like same aged peers when
they left the program?
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State Approaches to Measuring Child
Outcomes – 2010-11
Approach
Part C
Preschool
(N=56)
(N=59)
COS* 7 pt.
scale
43/56 (77%)
36/59 (61%)
One tool
statewide
7/56 (13%)
9/59 (15%)
Publishers’
online analysis
3/56 (5%)
6/59 (10%)
Other
5/56 (9%)
8/59 (14%)
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The National Data
• Child Outcomes
– Two-page summary
– Some recent presentations
– APR analysis
• Part C
• Preschool
• Family Indicator for Part C
– APR analysis
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ECO Child and Family Measurement
Frameworks and Self-Assessment
• Identify components of a high-quality
measurement system for child and family
outcomes
• Assist states in making informed decisions
as to which option is most effective and
best suited to the state's context.
• Child and Family Outcomes Measurement
System Tools
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Integrating Outcomes into IFSP/IEP
Process
• Using the child and family outcomes as a
framework to guide practice as well as
outcomes measurement
– Framework for assessment, planning, service
delivery
• Resources on integrating outcomes
• Learning community
– Contact [email protected]
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Themes of Agenda Sessions
Measurement System Framework Areas
Purpose: These sessions address aspects of articulating and communicating
the purpose of your state’s measurement system.
Data Collection and Transmission: Sessions address data collection
procedures (e.g. entering, transmitting, and storing data) and professional
development related to data collection.
Analysis: Sessions may focus on processes of data analysis, accountability,
and identification of program improvement questions.
Reporting: Topics address how state and local programs interpret, report,
and communicate information related to child and family outcomes.
Using Data: These sessions address how state and local programs can use
data to improve programs.
Evaluation: These sessions focus on evaluation of measurement systems.
Cross-system Coordination: These sessions address longitudinal data,
coordination across Part C and Section 619 and early childhood programs.
Program Improvement
Improving Practices: These sessions specifically highlight practices aimed at
improving outcomes.
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Contact ECO for assistance (please)
• How we can help
• General:
– [email protected]
• Specific staff person:
– http://projects.fpg.unc.edu/~eco/pages/peopl
e.cfm
– for email and phone numbers for ECO staff
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Questions or
comments?
www.the-eco-center.org
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