Child Protection in Tourism

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Transcript Child Protection in Tourism

Child Protection in Tourism
Ebru Kuzgun
Miray Divanoğlu
Some things cost more than we realize
Which one is Child Labor?
What is Child Labor?
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Not all work done by children should be classified
as child labor
is mentally, physically, socially or morally
dangerous and harmful to children
interferes with their schooling
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by depriving them of the opportunity to attend school
by obliging them to leave school prematurely or
by requiring them to attempt to combine school attendance
with excessively long and heavy work.
Child Labor in Tourism
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Tourism Industry offers wide variety of job opportunities for
children
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Entertainment
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Accomodation
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kitchen and scullery helpers, dishwashers
delivery boys, vendors of ice-cream, snacks
Transportation
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receptionists, baggage attendants,
bell-boys, helpers in laundry and ironing, cleaners
Food & Beverage
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vendors of postcards or tickets, flower-girls, shoeshine boys,
beach cleaners, dancers, masseuses, prostitutes
baggage attendants, bus attendants
car washers and guards, ship-boys
Souvenir production and Selling
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manufacturers, shell and pearl divers
souvenir vendors
Facts and Figures
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The International Labor Organization (ILO) estimates that 70% of child labor is
found in tourism sector and the most recent Global Monitoring Report on
Education for All indicates that more than 80% of out-of-school children are in
rural areas.
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The United Nations estimates that 700,000 to 4 million women and children are
trafficked around the world for purposes of forced prostitution, labor and other
forms of exploitation every year.
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The highest numbers of child laborers are in the Asia/Pacific region, where there
are 122 million working children. The highest proportion of child laborers is in Sub
Saharan Africa, where 26% of children (49 million) are involved in work.
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In Turkey, a survey of households to provide labor statistics showed that in 2006,
17,000 12 to 14 year-old children were working in hotels and restaurants, most of
them boys who were legally employed as "apprentices". The number of workers in
the 12 to 19-year-old age group totaled 90,000, i.e. 16.4 percent of employees in
this sector.
Why Children Work in Tourism
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Poverty
parental unemployment
 low family income
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Indigence and migration
The attractiveness of tourism
Quick money – easy money
 temporal limitation of jobs
 wide range of job opportunities
 no special trainings or skills
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Worst forms of Child Labor
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Dangerous activities in a hazardous environment
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Loss of schooling and lack of training
opportunities
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unhygienic, no safety regulations
long working hours, insecurity about their future
Sexual exploitation
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Child Pornography
Prostitution of children
Sex tourism of children
Extra-enticement of children for sexual acts
Sex Tourism of Children
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Traveling to a foreign country with the intent to
engage in sexual activity with a child younger than
the age of 18.
illegal activity which is subject
to prosecution.
Observed all around the world.
Reasons
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Economic difficulties, war, organized crime, globalization,
greed, family dysfunction, the drug trade,
low status of girls in many countries,
pornography and the promotion of sex tours on the
internet
International Organizations and the Protection
of Children in Tourism
ILO (International Labor Organization)
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IPEC (International Program on the Elimination of
Child Labor)
Campaigns of ILO and IPEC
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World Day against Child Labor - 12 June
SCREAM (Supporting Children's Rights through
Education, the Arts and the Media)
Red Card to Child Labor
UNICEF
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UNICEF (The United Nations Children´s Fund )
Works for overrall protection of childhood
 Is guided by principles & standards of the Convention &
Optional Protocol
 Works in 160 countries
UNWTO
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The Child Prostitution and Tourism Watch
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on-line database on focal points
Task Force to Protect Children from Sexual
Exploitation in Tourism
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The Task Force’s main objectives are:
 to build awareness among the tourism sector, governments and
tourists
 to encourage the tourism industry to engage in good and ethical
practices
 to invite governments to take administrative and legal measures
 to encourage co-operation between the public and private sector
 to monitor the fight against the sexual exploitation of children
ECPAT International
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Global network of organizations and individuals
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Seeks to encourage the world community to ensure that
children everywhere enjoy their fundamental rights free
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Permanent member
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of the World Tourism
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Organization’s (UNWTO)
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& Code of Conduct
Code of Conduct for the Protection of Children
from Sexual Exploitation in Travel and Tourism
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Independent organization funded by the Japan Committee for
UNICEF
Best practice for the protection of children’s rights
Winner of the “Ending Global Slavery: Everyday Heroes Leading
the Way” Ashoka Changemakers’ competition
Signed by over 800 companies in 32 countries
Signatory Countries:
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Austria ,Albania, Bulgaria, Belize, Brazil, Canada,
Columbia, Costa Rica, Denmark, Dom.Rep., Finland, Germany,
Italy, Guatemala, Japan, Kenya, Mongolia, Mexico, Netherlands,
Norway, Pakistan, Romania, Russia, Spain, Sweden,
Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, Turkey Vasco Travel, UK USA.
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Code of Conduct
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Six Criteria by signing the Code
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To establish an ethical policy regarding commercial sexual
exploitation of children.
To train the personnel in the country of origin and travel
destinations.
To introduce a clause in contracts with suppliers, stating a
common repudiation of commercial sexual exploitation of
children.
To provide information to travelers by means of catalogues,
brochures, in-flight films, ticket-slips, home pages, etc.
To provide information to local "key persons" at the
destinations.
To report annually.
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Conclusion
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Action should be taken by relavant parties;
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Individuals
NGO’s
Tourism Industry
Governments
Media
Discussion Points
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Is it wrong for a child to work? Why?
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Should child labor be regulated globally or
domestically?