CHANGING FACE OF CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

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Transcript CHANGING FACE OF CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

Education Panel
Jan Bray, Moderator, ACTE
Sandy Mittelsteadt, Zayn Consulting
Barbara Hins-Turner, Center of Excellence for Energy Technology
at Centralia College
Tom Applegate, Association for Career & Technical Education
Jim Hunter, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers
CHANGING FACE OF CAREER
AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION
Presented by
Janet B. Bray, CAE
ACTE Executive Director
OCTOBER 2006
THE FUTURE
THE MOST IMPORTANT REASON
TO STUDY POSSIBLE FUTURE
DEVELOPMENTS IS SO WE CAN
CHANGE THEM
KEY POINTS FOR DISCUSSION


Assumptions About The Future
The Flattening Global Economy

Current High School Reform Initiatives

Perspectives and Opportunities
Assumptions About the
Relevant Future Environment
Accountability (parents, legislators, business leaders)
will continue
No Child Left Behind-high stakes testing
Perkins Reauthorization
71% of Americans believe public schools are
falling behind.
“Every student needs a baccalaureate” statement is
still the American dream
General public (40%) and opinion leaders (60%)
identify math, science and technology as most
important to compete in global economy.
Assumptions About the
Relevant Future Environment
Rapid changes in the job market and workrelated technologies will necessitate
increased training for virtually every
worker.
STEM Initiative – increase 70% faster
There will be shortages of skilled and
knowledgeable workers; large number of
people retiring from business within the
period and higher mobility of people
between careers/jobs
Assumptions About the
Relevant Future Environment
Lifelong learning – average age of student in post
secondary/technical education will increase
The half-life of an engineer’s knowledge today is five years; in
10 years, 90% of knowledge will be available on the
computer.
In the next 10 years, close to 10 million jobs will open in the
highly skilled service occupations.
A substantial portion of the labor force will be in job training
at any moment. Much of this carried out by current
employers.
Assumptions About the
Relevant Future Environment
Students will expect information to be
delivered through electronic media – instant
messaging
Technology will challenge the applied
classroom - learning to occur beyond the
traditional classroom environment
Assumptions About the
Relevant Future Environment
Academic and elementary education is higher on the agenda
for current administration than career/technical
Increased emphasis on transitions between secondary/post
secondary/workforce
Increased focus on dropout/recovery statistics and strategies
States will be attempting to exert increased control over
educational agenda within their states at the same time
federal limitations on the way federal funds are used may
be increasingly limited via block grants
Assumptions About the
Relevant Future Environment
Classroom of the future will have no walls, no
clocks no age segregation – community
learning centers
US public education will face an uphill battle for
survival – increased home schooling
Retraining and active baby boomers will increase
demand for adult education.
The International Education Race
Percentage of population with a postsecondary credential
60%
51
50%
U.S.
Canada
Ireland
Japan
Korea
40
40%
43
31
30%
20%
10%
Education at a
Glance: OECD
Indicators 2003
0%
55-64
45-54
35-44
25-34
The International Education Race
Students Enrolled in Postsecondary
(in thousands)
1990
2000
% Change
U.S.
13.7
15.7
+15%
China
3.8
13.6
+258%
India
4.9
9.4
+92%
UNESCO, 2003
The World is Flat
A Brief History of the 21st Century
by Thomas L. Friedman
Friedman’s Ten Flattening Forces
1. Fall of the Berlin Wall
The events of November 9, 1989, tilted the worldwide balance
of power toward democracies and free markets.
2. Netscape IPO
The August 9, 1995, offering sparked massive investment in
fiber-optic cables.
3. Work flow software
The rise of apps from PayPal to VPNs enabled faster, closer
coordination among far-flung employees.
4. Open-sourcing
Self-organizing communities, à la Linux, launched a
collaborative revolution.
5. Outsourcing
Migrating business functions to India saved money and a third
world economy.
Friedman’s Ten Flattening Forces
6. Offshoring
Contract manufacturing elevated China to economic
prominence.
7. Supply-chaining
Robust networks of suppliers, retailers, and customers
increased business efficiency. See Wal-Mart.
8. Insourcing
Logistics giants took control of customer supply chains, helping
mom-and-pop shops go global. See UPS and FedEx.
9. In-forming
Power searching allowed everyone to use the Internet as a
"personal supply chain of knowledge." See Google.
10. Wireless
Like "steroids," wireless technologies pumped up collaboration,
making it mobile and personal.
Source: Wired Magazine, May 2005
Common Elements in High School
Reform



Rigorous curriculum (high expectations
for all by offering a core curriculum)
Relevance (career academies,
experiential learning, thematically
focused schools)
Relationships (support for students)
NGA Action Agenda, 2005
1.
Restore value to the high school diploma
Recommendations included aligning high school academic
standards with college and workplace expectations, upgrading
high school coursework, and creating college- and work-ready
tests.
2.
Redesign high schools
Recommendations included reorganizing low-performing high
schools first, expanding high school options in all communities
and providing support to low-performing students.
3.
Give high school students the excellent teachers and
principals they need
Recommendations included improving teacher knowledge and
skills, providing incentives to recruit and keep teachers where
they are needed most, and developing and supporting strong
principal leadership.
NGA Action Agenda, 2005
4.
Set goals, measure progress, and hold high schools and
colleges accountable
Recommendations included setting goals and measuring
progress, strengthening high school and postsecondary
accountability, and intervening in low-performing schools.
5.
Streamline and improve education governance
Recommendations included creating a common K–12 and
postsecondary agenda and improving coordination across the
two sectors.
American Diploma Project
1. Raise high school standards to the level of what is actually
required to succeed in college or in the workforce.
2. Require all students to take rigorous college and work-ready
curriculum.
3. Develop tests of college and work readiness that all students
will take in high school.
4. Hold high schools accountable for graduating all students ready
for college and work, and hold colleges accountable for the
success of the students they admit.
Reform Models Commonly
Used in High Schools






AVID
Coalition of Essential Schools
First Things First
High Schools That Work
Talent Development
America’s Choice
Increased focus on career clusters by states
Perspectives.…Opportunities for CTE

Congress clearly values
CTE, but may not fully
understand its potential.

High school reformers value
rigor, relevance, and
relationships -- but often
overlook CTE.

High school reformers want
to eliminate the low-level
academic track.

Continue to build
Congressional awareness
through local site visits.

Elbow for a seat at the high
school reform table -national and state-by-state,
district-by-district.

CTE should embrace this
goal -- document examples
of CTE students excelling in
academic achievement and
graduation rates.
Perspectives.…Opportunities for CTE



High School reformers value
college, particularly for
minorities and
disadvantaged students.


Some high school reformers
undervalue 2-year colleges
and certificate programs.

Political leaders are very
concerned about U.S.
economic competitiveness.

Make readiness for college
and work (a la American
Diploma Project) the goal for
every student.
Demonstrate the rigor,
market demand and social
advancement from CTE.
Promote rigorous CTE
engineering and science
programs as key to
economic competitiveness.
Incorporate
entrepreneurship, global
economics, and business
processes into CTE content.
The Challenge for CTE
For CTE in the 21st century, the challenge is
clear…………
How to maintain program integrity and
improve learning in an environment that
demands academic progress as the
bottom line.
By embracing its role in providing rigor,
relevance and relationships, CTE will
shape tomorrow’s high school success.
Energy Career
Academies
Sandy Mittelsteadt
Author of The Career Academy Toolkit
How Did You Become
Involved In The
Energy Industry?
• What interested you in the utility industry?
• How old were you?
• Did your high school counselor or teachers
help you decide?
Is Education Today
Encouraging Students To
Enter The Energy Field?
• If yes, how can you improve the
process?
• If no, what can you do about it?
What is the
Energy Career Academy
Initiative?
• Generate interest and encourage
students to consider the energy industry
as a fulfilling career
• Create a pipeline of high school
graduates with skills ready for both
entry-level employment and/or college
• Improve the quality of education in
America by adding relevancy and rigor
into the Energy Career Academies
What is a Career Academy?
• Complex model
• Small, safe, and supportive learning
environment that is personalized and
inclusive of all students
• A partnership among educators, parents,
businesses, and higher education to
broaden learning opportunities
• Both academic and career education
• All aspects of an industry
• Challenging, contextual curriculum with
project-based learning
How Do You Define
a Career Academy?
A career academy “has the heart of an
elementary school, the schedule of a
middle school, and the curriculum of a
high school.”
Bill Moore, Principal of Roosevelt High School
Yonkers, NY
What is the History of
Career Academies?
• Idea created in 1969
• First career academy called the “Electrical
Academy” at Edison High School,
supported by The Philadelphia Electric
Company
• Academy concept spread to automotive,
health, environmental, business, etc.
• Academy concept spread to California,
New York, Florida, Arkansas, etc.
• Widely accepted…24% of high schools
(U.S. Dept. of Ed)
• Regarded as prestigious programs.
Is There Research to Support
Career Academies?
• MDRC’s study
– Significantly cut dropout rates
– Increased attendance rates, credits earned toward graduation,
and preparation for post-secondary education
– Extended positive effects on school engagement to both highrisk and medium-risk students
– Improved the likelihood of students graduating on time
– Former academy students more apt to graduate from college
– Increases teachers’ satisfaction
– Academy alumni make 10% higher salaries that non-academy
graduates
Academy Funding Sources
• U. S. Dept. of Ed’s Smaller Learning
Communities.
• Gates’ Small School funding.
• Magnet School grants.
• Choice-charter school grants.
• Private foundations, such Walton
Foundation or Irvine Foundation.
• State funding, such as California and
Florida.
Why Promote Career Academies
Over Other Programs?
•
•
•
•
•
•
Appeal to all students.
Integrate academic subjects.
Make learning “real” or meaningful.
Considered prestigious programs.
Make sense.
Educate the “whole” student.
Homework Assignment
Imagine….
• …Students in high schools across the U.S. lined up
seeking admission to Energy Career Academies.
• …Classes counting toward college and/or apprenticeship
time. Students are learning skill building under mentor
supervision, academic preparation and working toward
certification in the energy field.
• …A majority of these graduates will go to work with
mentor firms. You have the opportunity to select the
“cream of the crop” students.
Today, there is only one utility career academy in the
U.S. Imagine hundreds of them across the U.S.
Imagine one in your community!
Contact Information:
Sandy Mittelsteadt
[email protected]
661.900.7822