What is a Mentor? - Medical College of Wisconsin

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Transcript What is a Mentor? - Medical College of Wisconsin

The Women’s Faculty Council Proudly Presents: John R. Raymond, Sr., MD

President and CEO Medical College of Wisconsin

Academic Mentoring in a Complex and Diverse World

Activity Objectives: Tuesday, April 5, 2011 12 Noon – 1:00 p.m. H1210-1250

• Attendees will be able to identify barriers to career development in academic medicine and related scientific fields.

• Attendees will be able to identify individual strategies to find and cultivate relationships with mentors in order to maximize chances of career advancement and success

Open to all Faculty

• Attendees will be able to identify institutional strategies to maximize mentorship and career development opportunities for faculty from diverse backgrounds The Medical College of Wisconsin is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Medical College of Wisconsin designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits ™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The following planners and presenters have disclosed that they have no commercial interests: Drs. Ellinas, Donohue, Drolet, Hulbert, Teves-Qualler, Gore, Hulbert, Kim, Lerch-Gaggl, Sahoo, Solberg-Woods, Weihrauch, Raymond The following planners and presenters have disclosed these commercial interests: Name Company NONE Role

Supported by the Office of Faculty Affairs

April 28

Meditation for Stress Relief and Optimal Health: A Scientific Discussion

Thim P. Nanda, MD Location: H1210-1230 Time: Noon-1:00 p.m

., May 18

Women as Leaders in our Community: Getting There, Staying There, and Effecting Change.

Gail Lione, Linda Mellowes, and Betsy Brenner Location: H1210-1320 Time: Noon-1:00 p.m

June 1 Come and Go Luncheon Honoring Cecilia J. Hillard, PhD 2011 Distinguished Service Award Recipient Location: History of Medicine Room (M3120) Time: 11:30 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Please drop in any time between 11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

EVENTS ARE OPEN TO ALL FACULTY MEMBERS

Academic Mentoring in a Complex and Diverse World

John R. Raymond, Sr., M.D.

MCW Women’s Faculty Council – April 5, 2011 “We Practice What We Teach”

Today’s Talk

Four Parts General comments on mentorship Advice for mentees Institutional commitment to mentorship Women’s Mentorship

General Comments on Mentorship

What is a Mentor?

According to the American Heritage®

Dictionary of the English Language, a mentor is “a wise and trusted counselor or teacher.” The Cambridge International Dictionary defines a mentor as a “person who gives another person help and advice over a period of time and often also teaches them how to do their job.”

What is a Mentor?

The term “ mentor ” is derived from Greek Mythology. Mentor was the faithful companion and trusted counselor of Odysseus, the King of Ithaca. When Odysseus left to campaign in the Trojan Wars, he entrusted Mentor to remain in Ithaca to take charge of the royal household. Mentor was also charged with educating Odysseus’ beloved son, Telemachus , in order to prepare him to become the next king.

The Original Mentor

Mentor was a wise and trusted counselor for Telemachus , safely guiding him through childhood, adolescence and into adulthood. Mentor served as a wise teacher, a role model, and a trusted counselor and adviser to Telemachus. The goddess of wisdom, Athene would often assume his form.

, was sufficiently impressed with Mentor that she

Identifying a Mentor

Advice for mentees Meet with your mentor often.

Listen to them. Encourage unvarnished honesty.

Show them your grant applications, teaching materials, tangible scholarship and manuscripts.

Solicit their advocacy.

Mentor and Telemachus

William Hamilton Ra "Calypso Receiving Telemachus and Mentor in the Grotto" Pablo E. Fabisch, from “Les Adventures de Telemaque"

Potential Faculty Mentors

Advice for mentees Division Director, Department Chair Dean Peer Senior Colleague Collaborator Research, Clinical, Education Directors Faculty Councilor

Great Mentors in Science

Bob Lefkowitz: My favorite scientific mentor

Great Mentors in Science

Bob Lefkowitz: My favorite scientific mentor

Bob’s Principles of Mentorship

Be enthusiastic.

Maintain focus.

Place things into perspective.

Expect good things to happen.

Dare to be bold.

Tell a good story.

Inglese and Raymond. Professor Robert J. Lefkowitz, M.D.: Scientist and Mentor Extraordinaire. ASSAY Drug Dev Technol 2:227-231 ,2003.

Other Principles of Mentorship

Be accessible.

Nurture the independence of the mentee.

Help the mentee build a network.

Give constructive criticism.

Help to set priorities, budget time, balance responsibilities.

Maintain confidentiality.

Qualities of a Good Mentor

Serves as a role model (mentors by example).

Is committed to mentoring. Encourages and motivates.

Commits time to be a mentor. Possesses appropriate knowledge and influence. Is willing to share knowledge. Is skilled at interpersonal communication skills.

Creates a continuous learning environment.

Great Mentors in Football

Woody and Bo

Great Mentors in Football

Woody and Bo… and Barry

Mentorship Wisdom

Benjamin Franklin “There are two ways to acquire wisdom; you can either buy it or borrow it. By buying it, you pay full price in terms of time and cost to learn the lessons you need to learn. By borrowing it, you go to those men and women who have already paid the price to learn the lessons and get their wisdom from them.”

Mentors

Ideal mentorship can be lifelong.

One mentee can have multiple mentors.

Mentee needs may change over time.

Mentee can be a mentor.

Peer-mentorship.

Networks facilitate mentorship.

Career Mentorship Timeline

Dr. Jack Feussner clinical mentor Dr. Bill Yarger clinical mentor Dr. Feussner scientific mentor Dr. Rosalie Crouch administrative mentor Dr. Feussner administrative mentor 1982

        

2011 Dr. Bob Lefkowitz scientific mentor Dr. David Ploth administrative mentor Dr. Ray Greenberg leadership mentor

Benefits to Mentors

Satisfaction.

Building a network of mentees who can help the mentor (mentees as mentors).

Retention of excellent colleagues.

Intellectual stimulation, self-renewal.

Enhancement of institutional reputation.

Enhancement of personal reputation.

Advice for Mentees

Maximize Chances of Success

Advice for mentees Join a scholarly group with overlapping interests and complementary skills.

Share ideas, reagents (teaching materials), methods.

Collaborate.

Solicit feedback on your scholarship (grants, manuscripts, teaching materials).

Maximize Chances of Success

Advice for mentees Engage in visible citizenship activities, and do a good job.

Remember, your administrators and mentors want you to succeed. Your success is a positive reflection on them, and on MCW.

Maximize Chances of Success

Advice for mentees Set goals. Plan ahead!

Identify obstacles and eliminate them.

Identify opportunities and pursue them.

Follow up progress. Take stock, assess.

Listen!

Maximize Chances of Success

Advice for mentees Do something every day to position yourself to optimize your chances of success.

Make your independence obvious to everyone, but also be viewed as a good collaborator and colleague. Collegiality matters!

Stay focused, be determined.

Get and give feedback!

Maximize Chances of Success

Advice for mentees Strive to be thought of as… Dependable.

Self-sufficient.

Devoted to excellence.

Accountable. Brimming with potential.

An asset to those around you.

Maximize Chances of Success

Advice for mentees Take a hard look at your CV… Organization and presentation. Identity with a scholarly area.

Can the reader quickly pick out your most noteworthy accomplishments? Scholarship, service/clinical care, teaching, mentorship, science.

National and local visibility.

Independence

Advice for mentees Necessary for tenure and promotion.

Tricky to develop independence in a mentored environment.

Must develop a reputation that is clearly distinct from your mentor.

Tricky to develop independence in a collaborative environment.

Evidence of Independence

Advice for mentees R01 (or national award) is one of the best ways to establish independence.

Editorial boards or Study Section memberships National policy, advisory or accrediting boards.

National teaching awards.

Creation of new course work or contribution to curriculum.

Intellectual property generation.

Institutional Commitment to Mentorship

Why is Mentorship Important for the Medical College?

People are our most important asset.

Personnel is our single largest expenditure category.

Training people is an expensive investment; and mentoring increases return on that investment.

Recruiting is more expensive than retaining good people.

We are in the business of lifelong learning.

Create Incentives for Mentors

Financial incentives.

Release time.

Credit in promotion and tenure processes.

Public recognition.

Mentors’ toolbox.

Create a Culture that Values Mentorship

Rewards for mentors.

Processes that encourage mentorship.

Society of Mentors?

Build networks that facilitate supportive interactions.

- Women in Science - Society of Teaching Scholars - Women’s Faculty Council

Create a Culture that Values Mentorship

Discard “cookie-cutter” notions of what constitutes a successful academic career.

Broaden promotion and tenure criteria to reflect institutional complexity.

- Entrepreneurship, translation.

- Collaboration.

- Service.

- Innovation.

- Scholarship broadly defined.

Create a Culture that Values Mentorship

Mentorship guru?

Faculty and staff development activities.

Focused career enhancement efforts.

- Research planning grant retreats.

- Apple Tree Society of Teachers.

- Trustees Leadership Academy.

- Society of Clinical Research and Translational Early Scientists

Critical Roles for Department Chairs and Division Directors

Most influential mentors due to written contract and formalized supervisory roles.

Annual contracting process provides opportunities for… - assessment of career progression.

- honest feedback/constructive criticism.

- alignment of individual goals and aspirations with institutional resources and needs

Women’s Mentorship

Challenges of Women’s Mentorship

Women’s mentorship needs Not identical with men.

Women may not have been socialized the same way as men.

Women bring different skills and perspectives.

Men tend to focus on deliverables, women on relationships.

Biological realities and societal expectations are different.

Challenges of Women’s Mentorship

Women’s mentorship needs Appropriate role models.

Networking challenges – old boy network.

Assertiveness.

Goal orientation – deliverables.

Balance in life.

Balance in career.

Importance of self-promotion.

Challenges of Women’s Mentorship

Women’s mentorship needs Women’s contributions may be less quantifiable or valued in patriarchal organizations.

Options - change how one presents one’s self or change the organization.

Example of Successful Women Mentoring Successful Women

Maya Angelou and Oprah Winfrey

Example of Successful Women Mentoring Successful Women

Dr. Rosalyn Yalow and Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus

Example of Successful Women Mentoring Successful Men

Michelle Robinson and President Barack Obama

Example of Successful Men Mentoring Successful Women

PM’s Brian Mulroney and Kim Campbell

Noteworthy Quote

Anton Ehrenzweig “Every student deserves to be treated as a potential genius.” Ehrenzweig A (1967) The Hidden Order of Art Paladin

Modified Noteworthy Quote

Taking liberties with a quotation “Every student woman deserves to be treated as a potential genius.” Ehrenzweig A (1967) The Hidden Order of Art Paladin

Acknowledgment

I thank Cyndee Hansen for assistance with research for this presentation.

Thank you!

Academic Mentoring in a Complex and Diverse World

John R. Raymond, Sr., M.D.

MCW Women’s Faculty Council – April 5, 2011 “We Practice What We Teach”