Name of Presentation - National Association of School Nurses

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Transcript Name of Presentation - National Association of School Nurses

The Role of the School
Nurse in School Wellness
Policies and Practices
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
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N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Agenda
• The Basics of Local
Wellness Policies (LWP)
• How School Nurses can
help implement LWP
• What is Fuel Up to Play
60?
• School Nurse Success
Story
• Questions/Answers
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Local Wellness Policies
Amy Moyer
Director of Field Operations
Action for Healthy Kids
[email protected]
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Who is Action for Healthy Kids?
Action for Healthy Kids®
(AFHK) fights childhood
obesity, undernourishment
and physical inactivity by
helping schools become
healthier places so kids can
live healthier lives.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Who is Action for Healthy Kids?
Our goal is to create school
communities where children
learn how to make healthy
choices from the minute they
walk in the front door to the
minute they leave at the end of
the school day.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
What is a policy?
 An official statement that
addresses the needs of a school
system, school or classroom
 Based on values, convictions
and beliefs
 Can play a major role in
changing school culture
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
School Wellness Policies
The 2004 Child Nutrition and WIC
Reauthorization Act required districts to have a
wellness policy that includes:

Nutrition guidelines for foods served on
school campus

Goals for nutrition education, physical
activity and other school-based activities

A plan for measuring implementation
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
School Wellness Policies
Wellness policies must be developed and
implemented by “local parents, teachers,
administrators, school food service, school boards
and the public.”
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
School Wellness Policies
The 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act added:
 Required reporting on policy
content and implementation
 Required periodic assessments
 Goals for nutrition promotion
Learn more about the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act and local
wellness policies at: www.fns.usda.gov/tn/healthy/lwp5yrplan.pdf
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Action Steps
 Read your district policy
and any school policies
or guidelines.
 Pay attention to policy
language.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Action Steps

Use the policy or school
guidelines as a platform for
your wellness projects.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Meeting Wellness Policy Goals
Nutrition Education and
Promotion
 Healthy food tastings
 Health fairs
 School gardens
 Educational signage
 Staff nutrition
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Meeting Wellness Policy Goals
Nutrition Guidelines
 Salad bars
 Fresh fruits and veggies
at lunch
 Limitations on unhealthy
options for a la carte,
stories or concessions
 Healthy snacks and
celebrations guidelines
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Meeting Wellness Policy Goals
Physical Activity/Education
 Quality PE Classes led by
certified PE Teacher
 Walking school buses
 Active recess
 Before or after-school sports
or exercise clubs
 Physical activity breaks in the classroom
 Schoolyard or playground improvements
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Meeting Wellness Policy Goals
Health Promotion
 Recess before lunch
 Family health nights
 Healthy rewards
 TV-turnoff week
 Healthy fundraisers
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Action Steps

N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Promote the
policy and your
school’s wellness
practices.
Strengthening Your District Policy
 Join your District Wellness
Committee or School Health
Advisory Council (SHAC).
 Join or start a wellness team at
your school and create wellness
guidelines specific to your
school practices.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Strengthening Your District Policy
 Integrate your
wellness policy into
your school
accountability system
and school
improvement plan.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
The Role of the School Nurse in
School Wellness Policies and
Practices
Shirley Schantz, EdD, RN, ARNP [email protected]
National Association of School Nurses
www.nasn.org
NASN - School Wellness Policies
http://www.nasn.org/Default.aspx?tabid=318
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School Nurse Role in School Health
Advisory Council
 Interpret the role of school health services and school
nursing
 Collaborate with other disciplines – [ Coordinated school
health model ]
 Identify community resources for students and families
(Sheetz, 2011)
School wellness committees are a venue to highlight
and promote the need for school health and the
relationship of health and academics.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
As a Leader or Participant
Identifier of incidence of diet-related chronic
disease and indications for prevention and
treatment – High blood pressure; Bullying; Acanthosis
nigricans; Type 2 diabetes; Exercise induced
asthma; Allergies
Advisor/consultant on school health committees;
advise on the necessity of good nutrition for
learning and brain function – School health expert
Advocate for healthy, nutritious food and beverage
choices to be made available in all school vending
machines, school stores, snack bars, and any area
in school where food is sold
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
As a Leader or Participant
Active participant or team leader in wellness policy
implementation and evaluation
Health/nutrition educator for students, staff, parents
and community
Liaison with school and community as well as
student And family involvement
Implementer and manager of wellness policy and
school based programs
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
As a Leader or Participant
Advocate for school and community facilities for
physical activities for all
Provider of health referrals as appropriate and as
needed
Provider of support and follow up as needed
Student Involvement

N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
The Coordinated School
Health Model
The Coordinated School Health model
serves as an excellent template on which to
strengthen wellness concepts already in
place.
The eight components assist schools to
include all of the support services provided
for students and staff.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
The Coordinated School
Health Model
 Health Education
 Physical Education
 Healthy & Safe School
 Health Services
 Nutrition Services
 Counseling, Psychological, Social Services
 Health Promotion for Staff
 Family/Community Involvement
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Identify Outcomes
Research based outcomes of the Child Nutrition
and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 are being
identified, school nurses can consider positive
outcomes for the health of students.
  Current research indicates the diet of the
 average student is less than ideal.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Role of the School Nurse
 School nursing is a specialized practice of
professional nursing that advances the well-being,
academic success and lifelong achievement and
health of students.
98% (52 million) children spend their days in school
75.1% of schools have a school nurse
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Overweight and Obesity in Schools
-The Role of the School Nurse (PS)
It is the position of the NASN that school nurses have the
knowledge and expertise to promote the prevention of
overweight and obesity and address the needs of
overweight and obese youth in schools.
The school nurse collaborates with students, families,
school personnel, and health care providers to promote
healthy weight and identify overweight and obese youth
who may be at risk for health problems
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Overweight and Obesity in Schools
-The Role of the School Nurse (PS)
The school nurse refers and follows up with
students who may need to see a health care
provider.
The school nurse educates and advocates
for changes in the school and district that
promote a healthy lifestyle for all students.
http://www.nasn.org/Portals/0/positions/2011psoverweight.pdf
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
School Nurses’ Role in Overweight
and Obesity in children
1. Capacity to reach large number of youth from diverse groups
2. Provide education and resources and promote a culture of
health in schools
3. Promote and advocate for healthy lifestyles for all students
4. Identify resources/tools and referrals for children and
parents/guardians
5. Promote policies that increase access to healthful foods and
daily physical activity
Call to Action
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
School Nurses have promoted and
participated in:
 Walking paths around
schools
 Fruit first in cafeteria line
 Fruit in slices
 More nutritious breakfasts
 Breakfast / classroom
 Before during and after
school walking programs
 Promoting water
 Nutrition ed in classroom
 Color days for fruits and
vegetables
 Wellness policy leaders
 Changes in vending
machine options
 Pedometers
 Playgrounds & gyms
open non school hours
 Biggest loser personnel
 Vegetable gardens
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
The Case For School Nursing
Advocacy, Access and Achievement:
Making the Connection
http://www.nasn.org/Home/CaseForSchoolNursing
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Every parent, student
and teacherdeserves a
School Nurse
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
References
 Sheetz, A.H. (2011). Why Is a School Health
(Wellness) Advisory Council Important for
School Nursing Practice? NASN School
Nurse, 26(5), 280-282.
 Kelly, M. & Schantz, S. (2011). School Nurses
Can Make a Difference With We Can!
NASN School Nurse, 26(2), 89-90.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Get Active, Eat Healthy,
Make a Difference
Nancy Sandbach, VP, National Dairy Council
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
73,000
Schools
 Students are motivated to
make better food choices –
such as fruits, vegetables,
whole grains and dairy –
and be more physically
active before, during and
after school.
 Schools have increased
access to nutrient-rich foods
and sustained opportunities
for physical activity
 Continually improve school
environments, with school
stakeholders supportive of
nutrient-rich foods and
physical activity
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
 65% of educators say Fuel Up to Play 60 helps them achieve their
school wellness goals.
 70% of educators say Fuel Up to Play 60 is helping students make
healthier food choices.
 62% of educators say Fuel Up to Play 60 is helping increase the
amount of time students are physically active at school.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
We Need You!
Be a Program Advisor!
FuelUpToPlay60.com
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Kathy Beezley RN, Program Advisor
Rogers Middle School
Affton School District
St. Louis, MO
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Rogers Middle School
Spring 2010-present
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
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Affton School District, 2500 students
St. Louis suburb, borders St. Louis City
Rogers Middle School (6-8 grade ) 575 students
45 % free and reduced lunch
20% do not use English as their primary language at home
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Find a support team. I was very lucky in that Mr. Remelius,
our principal, is very interested in health and wellness. I also
have a wonderful secretarial staff who have been supportive
and understanding.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
RMS Wii Fit Club
 40-50 students once a week
 Wiis are also used at lunch, as incentives, at summer camp
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Grab-n-Go Breakfast
 Students travel to cafeteria and lobby between
periods (8:30) to purchase breakfast.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Grab-n-Go Breakfast
 Two stations are set up each morning by our
nutrition service. (contract by school district).
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Trivia Tuesdays
Students are asked a nutrition question during announcements and get a
chance to answer during lunch. Those students who answer correctly
have a chance to win a prize. Ambassadors take care of passing out and
picking up answer sheets.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Fitness Fridays!
 Every Friday we
spend at least one
minute – or 3!!
 Exercising or
dancing to a song
(chosen by the
Unit) during
Homeroom.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
You’ll Love Yoga
Part of the funding provided by FUTP 60 was used to start a yoga class for
students who were interested. Yoga is used to help build strength, flexibility and
confidence. Correct breathing can help to decrease stress (THEY LOVED IT!!!).
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Taste Testing at RMS
Ambassadors help with handing out cheese samples for taste testing. We
also tasted fresh veggies with low fat dip, frozen yogurt and fresh fruit.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
“Build Your Own Shake Up” at RMS
We received funding for
Dietitians from St. Louis
University to come and
teach all 8th grade
students how to make
healthy after school
snacks emphasizing the
importance of dairy.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Back to Football Friday
Being part of the Fuel Up to Play 60 team affords opportunities to
network and “keeps me in the loop.” Fuel Up to Play 60 also provides
information on other grants that may be available.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Association with other Wellness Programs
Fuel Up to Play 60 also provides an opportunity for me to connect with
other wellness initiatives, such as Play 60, Action for Healthy Kids and
American Heart Association.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Networking with the Rams
We won the Back to Football Friday celebration 2011 which is sponsored by the
NFL and Play 60. Winning $10,000 helped us build a walking path for students
and the community. Learning about this grant opportunity came from reading
my “dashboard” and emails.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
From Farm to School – Farmer Rich & Farmer Paul
Farmer Paul visited our 6th graders to explain where foods come from. In the
spring we were able to plant our own garden. Farmer Rich plowed our “field”
and tilled the soil after the compost was delivered.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Students Enjoy Working Outside
Two of our Student Ambassadors help Farmer Rich move
the compost.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
RMS Garden
Students and staff alike enjoyed the garden. We are working to make
improvements for next year and have plans to start a “garden club” for
2012-13.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
You Get to Meet Cool People!
La’Roi Glover came to visit when Courtney presented me
with the “Missouri Program Advisor of the Year” award!!!
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Students Taking the Fuel up to Play 60 Pledge
This year I had the
opportunity to speak
to EVERY student
about Fuel Up to Play
60. They all took the
pledge to be healthy
and play 60 minutes
per day.
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
National Touchdown Dance Challenge Winners
Two of our Student Ambassadors came to school over the summer to
participate in the Touchdown Dance challenge and WE WON!!!!!!! An
NFL player will visit us soon, YEA!!!
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Affton Days Parade
So many students turned out to walk in the parade because we were
promoting Fuel Up to Play. Also, let’s be real…because it’s fun!!!!!
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
www.FuelUpToPlay60.com
Click “I’m an Educator” – to get to homepage
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
Fuel Up to Play 60 Help Desk
1-800-752-4337
Mon-Fri 8:00am-5:00pm eastern
N a m e o f P re s e n t a t i o n
My Fuel Up to Play 60 Team
[email protected]
314-633-5975
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