The Changing World of Safety on College Campuses

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Transcript The Changing World of Safety on College Campuses

The Changing World of Safety on College Campuses

47 th Annual Association of Kansas Community College Occupational Professionals Conference

March 27, 2014 Ben Smith and Jason Kegler

Roadmap

• • • • •

Importance of Safety Active Shooter Events (ASE’s) Gun Legislation Things you can do Conclusion

Importance of safety

• • • • Absolute or State of mind Maslow’s Hierarchy of Need Government Regulations Recent Events – Changes in KS statutes – Mass shootings

What are your perceptions?

• • Do you know of threats or violence during the past year where you work?

• Have you been personally threatened during work hours?

Are there specific places on your campuses that you feel unsafe?

Perception vs. Reality

Perception vs. Reality

• • Perception is school shootings happen often • Reality is the CDC puts your chances of being shot at school at less than one in a million chance • From strictly a risk management perspective, “storm shelters before flack jackets” According to Texas State University and NYPD studies, the number of ASE’s is increasing annually

Texas State University Study Results

Frequency of ASE’s

Source: “United States Active Shooter Events from 2000 to 2010: Training and Equipment Implications”, Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training, Texas State University, March, 2013

Attack Locations of ASE’s

Source: “United States Active Shooter Events from 2000 to 2010: Training and Equipment Implications”, Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training, Texas State University, March, 2013

Number of people shot

Source: “United States Active Shooter Events from 2000 to 2010: Training and Equipment Implications”, Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training, Texas State University, March, 2013

Most powerful weapon used

Source: “United States Active Shooter Events from 2000 to 2010: Training and Equipment Implications”, Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training, Texas State University, March, 2013

Resolution of ASE’s in US (2000-2010)

Source: “United States Active Shooter Events from 2000 to 2010: Training and Equipment Implications”, Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training, Texas State University, March, 2013

New York Police Department Study Results

NYPD Study of 2012 ASE’s

2012 = 3 times the average of the previous 5 years!

Source: “Active Shooter: Recommendations and Analysis for Risk Mitigation 2012 Edition”, Counterterrorism Bureau of the New York City Police Department (NYPD), NYPD Printing Section, 2013

Age of Attackers – NYPD Study –

Bimodal

School shooting peak ages 15-19

Non-school peak ages 35-44

Source: “Active Shooter: Recommendations and Analysis for Risk Mitigation 2012 Edition”, Counterterrorism Bureau of the New York City Police Department (NYPD), NYPD Printing Section, 2013

Other Characteristics – NYPD Study –

96% male

98% alone

74% planned; 26% random

Source: “Active Shooter: Recommendations and Analysis for Risk Mitigation 2012 Edition”, Counterterrorism Bureau of the New York City Police Department (NYPD), NYPD Printing Section, 2013

Who is this?

Cho Seung Hui-April 17, 2007

• • • • • • Killed 32 people and wounded 17 at Virginia Tech Shooting Spree began at 7:15am ending with him taking his own life around 9:45am.

Approximately 72 separate incidents occurred prior to April 17.

Incidents included personal threats, inappropriate behavior, and awkward discussions In 2005, Cho was found “mentally ill and in need of hospitalization”.

Weapons were legally purchased

Who is this?

James Holmes-July 20, 2012

• • • • • Killed 12 and wounded 58 in movie theater in Aurora, CO • Had been enrolled as a Ph.D. Student in Neuroscience at the University of Colorado Psychiatrists believed he had a mental illness and could be dangerous Had a history of making homicidal statements Close acquaintances feared he was violent Weapons were legally purchased

What does a mass shooter look like??

What does a mass shooter look like?

• We can make assumptions: – Sex, Race, Age, Economic Background • The FACTS indicate: – There is NO standard profile – Suspects exhibit

behavioral concerns

– Some major life-changing trigger event occurs

Behavioral concerns?

• • • • Increased absenteeism Increased use of alcohol or drugs Increased depression or withdrawal Increased mood swings

Behavioral concerns?

• • • Suicidal comments or comments regarding hurting oneself Changes in hygiene or appearance Cold or uncaring affect – lack of any emotion

Other types of workplace violence

• According to the Bureau of Justice statistics, – You are eighteen times (18X) more likely to experience workplace violence than a fire – Every hour in the workplace, twenty-six women will be raped or sexually assaulted – Every day, two people are murdered in the workplace

Can we stop these types of events?

Can we stop these types of events?

NO, more than likely, not.

Average ASE event over in 3-8 minutes.

Average police response time 3-8 minutes.

Who are the first responders to these types of events?

We are.

Standard Police Response

• • • •

Find Threat, Neutralize Threat No first aid No hand holding or comforting No room clearing until threat is neutralized

NCCC held an active shooter scenario training exercise in January, 2014.

Shooter walked at a normal pace through four buildings in less than six minutes and prior to law enforcement’s arrival on campus

Killed 13, wounded 27

Have any of your colleges held active shooter training exercises?

What did you learn from your exercise?

We learned communication is almost always the biggest issue

Letting employees and students know clear, concise information in a timely manner

Communicating between college personnel, between college personnel and responding agencies, and between the responding agencies

We needed more training!

Outside Influences

Kansas Statutes

KS 2013 Legislation

Kansas Personal and Family Protection Act

Allows for conceal carry on college campuses unless “adequate security measures” are deployed

Colleges may apply for exemption while they develop security plan

What can we do in the event of an active shooter?

Safety best practices

Don’t scream and point

Engage only if you have important information

Drop everything, hands up, fingers spread

In the event of an active shooter, FEMA recommends:

Run

Hide

Fight

Source: “IS-907: Active Shooter; What You Can Do”, FEMA Emergency Management Institute, October 31, 2013

What can we do in to address safety concerns in general (fire, severe weather, sexual assault or harassment)?

Safety best practices

As employees we should:

Train regularly on emergency procedures and college policies

– Stay alert – Remain informed – Foster a culture of reporting • “See something – Say something”

As individuals we should:

Train regularly on emergency procedures

– Park under or near lights – Walk with your head up and display confidence – Check surroundings as you walk

As individuals we should:

– – – –

Train regularly on emergency procedures

Know where exits are located wherever you are – identify evacuation routes – Sit near exits in classrooms and meeting rooms Utilize the buddy system whenever possible Know where emergency equipment such as AED’s are located

Conclusion:

Train regularly on emergency procedures and college policies

– Use the tools at your disposal

Tools at your disposal

• • • • Your wits and intellect – YOU are your own greatest asset!

Your college’s emergency action plan Your college’s chief safety officer FEMA Active Shooter Training – see training course and video below: http://www.training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/I S/is907.asp

Questions or Comments?